ACTUALITE Aéronautique

ACTUALITE Aéronautique : Suivi et commentaire de l\'actualité aéronautique


Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Partagez

Beochien
Whisky Charlie

Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par Beochien le Mer 4 Fév 2009 - 18:19

Bonsoir

Aprés les essais du GTF sous l'aile du A340-600 d'essais, A Toulouse !

P&W se fend d'une communication pour éclaircir l'Horizon (Lointain encore )

A noter, vers les 20 % d'écos au lieu de 12, avec un coeur moderne !
Et un super Taux de dilution à attendre, vu les rapports du réducteur annoncés ! de X12, vers X16 ou plus !
Une part des technos en développement pour Bombardier et Mitsu incorporée!
Plus d'autres développements à attendre avec de possibles rétrofits vers les séries C et MRJ ! Bon toute la panoplie "Moderne" en route !
Un proto vers 2013 .... c'est loin! MaisP&W a été échaudé avec le GTF ! Prudence donc !
Prêts pour les monocouloirs vers 2017-2019 (j'attendais 2015-16, dixit MTU)! Si tant est que les Mono couloirs sont lancés vers cette date ?? Mais une EIS A et B , vers 2020 et plus, généralement admise ....
Et si les futurs MC lancés, le sont avec une techno qui convienne au GTF ! Attention, open rotors peut être !

Silence prudent pour l'éventuelle techno actuelle du GTF, avec le coeur du P&W 6000 qui pourrait (Peut être ) donner un coup de jeune aux 318-319-320 ...

Mon interprétation, Airbus pas décidé today, et le pétrole bas .... pas à l'ordre du jour pour l'instant ... sauf si des clients se manifestent (Dixit J Leahy) mais pour qu'ils se manifestent, encore faudrait il une première offre, même assez shématique ...
Ou peut être, si accord il y à, discrétion pour l'instant, négotiations en cours !
A suivre !

--------------------- De Flightglobal Extrait ----------------------

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2009/02/04/322071/pw-to-begin-testing-advanced-gtf-demonstrator-by.html

This proposed "advanced GTF" will deliver up to 10% more efficiency that the current engine, giving it at least a 20% advantage over today's engines.

Speaking at an event in Toulouse to officially mark the end of the current GTF demonstrator's flight-test campaign on Airbus's A340-600 flying testbed, P&W vice-president next-generation product family Bob Saia says that the engine maker has identified its "next step of technology features" and expects to begin testing advanced concepts on a demonstrator by 2013.

"The GTF that enters service in 2013 is in the 12-15% [lower fuel burn range than current engines] and we'd like to improve fuel consumption by another 8-10%, so we'd be looking at a total of around 20%," he says.

The areas being examined "touch all aspects of the engine - for example aerodynamics, lightweight materials, improving the thermal efficiency of the core, and more temperature-capable material", he says. "We want to make the fan bigger and increase the gear ratio from 3:1 on the current GTF to 4:1 or 5:1 to increase propulsive efficiency."

Saia says that P&W launched the programme in mid-2008 and aims to start laboratory and windtunnel testing some of the features in 2010, ahead of flying a full-scale demonstrator in "late 2012-13". He says this timetable will enable P&W "to have the advanced GTF available in the 2017-2019 timeframe, depending upon when those aircraft will be looking for new powerplants".

Although the advanced GTF is aimed at the expected single-aisle replacement aircraft from Airbus and Boeing, Saia says that P&W has had no discussions with either company about operating a joint flight-test programme with the demonstrator.

While the current GTF demonstrator uses the core of the existing PW6000 engine, Saia says the advanced-GTF demonstrator will adopt the core from one of the production PW1000G GTF engines being developed for the Bombardier CSeries and Mitsubishi MRJ regional jet - possibly with advanced technology incorporated. He adds the aim is to enable as much of the technology to be developed for the advanced GTF transferrable to the first-generation PW1000G GTFs.

Béochien

Beochien
Whisky Charlie

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par Beochien le Mer 4 Fév 2009 - 22:31

Tiens, quand on parle du loup !

Prémonitions ??

Noter qu'ils parlent de la version "Soft" du GTF de P&W, celle essayée chez Airbus ces dernières semaines , basée sur le PW6000, dispo peut être en 24-30 mois ! Bon timing pour Ryanair, en plus !
Une explication peut être à la discrétion d'Airbus sur le sujet, peut être !
Et une possible belle épine pour le 737, Boeing risque de souffrir pour le monter, le GTF, l'avion est trop bas, train à rehausser !!

Note : Je la poste en double côté moteurs !

-------------- De FlightGlobal, Le Blog de Jon Ostrower ! Extrait ----------------

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/flightblogger/

Ryanair is planning to place a massive order for 400 aircraft in the next 12-24 months for delivery between 2012 and 2017. Ryanair is known for its large orders, but what makes this revelation significant is not the size of the order, but rather which aircraft manufacturer the airline may order from. Once thought to be among the most loyal Boeing customers, Ryanair is opening the door to Airbus to offer the A320 and A321 to join its all 737-800 fleet.

The Irish airline has always held closely to the low-cost tenet of flying one type of aircraft, but Deputy Chief Executive Officer Michael Cawley insists that, "We're large enough now to run two fleets. We see no cost handicaps that can't be overcome by running two fleets."

Coinciding with this revelation was Pratt & Whitney's announcement that it had completed its PW1000G Geared Turbofan demonstrator flight test program in Toulouse. The engine was flown under the wing of an Airbus A340-600 for more than 75 hours in its second and final flight test phase.

The test flight program ignited speculation that Airbus was considering flying a 30,000 lb variant of the PW1000G on A320 family aircraft for a significant mid-life performance improvement ahead of a full narrow-body replacement expected late in the next decade at the earliest.

One industry source associated with Pratt & Whitney's geared turbofan development says the engine-maker has laid the strategic and budgetary groundwork for developing a PW1000G for the A320 and/or 737 in anticipation of airline demand through the heart of the next decade.

Pratt & Whitney emphasizes that its focus remains on beginning detailed design work for the MRJ and CSeries aircraft engines for a PW1000G entry into service come 2013.

Béochien

Beochien
Whisky Charlie

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par Beochien le Ven 6 Fév 2009 - 23:05

HoHo

P&W downgrade ses ambitions !

Il y à 6 mois, vers Farnborough, P&W parlait beaucoup, d'un GTF de haute puissance pour le bicouloirs ...

Et aujourd'hui, plus question avant 10-15 ans !

Une révision à la baisse pour raison de crise ou de crédits de dévlpt ...

Sais pas, mais ce ne sera pas pour les A350 , premières fournées du moins, et les A330 seront arrêtés !

Et peut être pas non plus pour les B787 ... même s'ils sont trés trés trés en retard Suspect

Reste un quad A350 avec 40 000 lbs et quelques ??? Suspect jocolor

Bon, le paquet sera mis jusquà 40 000 lbs, ce qui devrait convenir pour la prochaine géné de monocouloirs, et les avions actuels (340-300, 321, 737 ?? et le TU 204 ?? c'est moi qui l'invente ce dernier)

------------------------ l'article FlightGlobal --------------------------

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2009/02/06/322074/pw-rules-out-any-early-move-to-offer-gtf-architecture-for-widebody.html

P&W rules out any early move to offer GTF architecture for widebody powerplant
By Max Kingsley-Jones

Pratt & Whitney has ruled out any near-term development of a high-thrust development of its GTF geared turbofan engine to power widebody aircraft like the Airbus A350 XWB, as it wants to initially focus on thrust levels below 40,000lb (178kN).

P&W vice-president next generation product family Bob Saia says that while he sees "no thrust limitations" for its GTF architecture "unfortunately, for a programme like the A350, we're not ready to develop that large an engine with this technology".

Saia says that while P&W envisages "being able to take this architecture up to 70,000 80,000 and 90,000lb thrusts, today all our testing has been done at or below 40,000lb, so we would prefer to launch this product in a market environment where we have actual data.

"So for now we want to focus on the 14-40,000lb thrust class," he says.

Saia revealed at the Farnborough air show last year that P&W had been approached by an unnamed aircraft manufacturer to study a GTF application for a widebody aircraft. Saia says now that was for a potential application in the 2025 timeframe and that the A350, which is due to enter service in 2013, is too early for the technology.

"We envision that in 10 or 15 years from now when the big widebodies are being replaced, we'll be ready for that," he says.

Béochien

alain57
Whisky Quebec

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par alain57 le Mer 4 Mar 2009 - 15:26

Pratt & Whitney's PurePower(TM) Engine Wins Aviation Week
Laureate Award .........une récompense pour PW.

http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/090304/ne78668.html?.v=1

article intéréssant a lire en entier sous le lien.....

WASHINGTON, March 4 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- The Pratt & Whitney
PurePower(TM) PW1000G engine team won the 2009 Aviation Week Laureate Award for
outstanding achievement in Aeronautics and Propulsion. The annual awards, from
Aviation Week & Space Technology magazine, recognize extraordinary
achievements of individuals and teams in aerospace, aviation and defense. Pratt
& Whitney accepted the honor at an awards ceremony in Washington, D.C. Pratt
& Whitney is a division of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE: UTX - News).

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Lun 30 Mar 2009 - 22:58

Quelques petits éléments autour du Purepower PW1000G

http://www.atwonline.com/news/story.html?storyID=16088



Pratt's geared turbofan may be bright spot in difficult year


Pratt's geared turbofan may be bright spot in difficult year
Monday March 30, 2009 Pratt & Whitney executives said last week that interest in the PurePower PW1000G geared turbofan engine has increased since Lufthansa's recent commitment to Bombardier's CSeries and that additional orders may boost a company whose parent, United Technologies, has launched a major restructuring featuring up to 11,600 job cuts this year.

"Orders beget orders. We expect this to stimulate more order action for the CSeries," Pratt & Whitney President David Hess said last week at the company's Hartford headquarters. "There is a lot of discussion going on, a lot of orders out there that could potentially be announced this year. . .Getting a launch order from Lufthansa could really help get traction in the marketplace."

LH signed a letter of intent for 30 CSeries aircraft plus 30 options at last year's Farnborough Air Show but did not firm the order until this month (ATWOnline, March 12). The apparent delay produced speculation about the program's viability, although Pratt's GTF already had been selected by Mitsubishi for its new regional jet and launch customer ANA. Both aircraft are scheduled to enter service in 2013.

'We were highly confident because we felt we understood the process Lufthansa was going to go through to complete their selection," P&W President-Commercial Engines and Global Services Todd Kallman told ATWOnline. "I do feel very positive that there will be other orders. There are ongoing discussions and actually at [this month's ISTAT annual conference in Arizona] a couple people talked to us and said, 'Hey, this is good. We're going to continue to look at this thing'."

Kallman and VP-Next Generation Product Family Bob Saia also stressed that Pratt is on schedule with design and testing of the PW1000G's new core, which "will have 100% new parts." The fan drive gear system that anchors the engine has been tested on the core of a PW6000, which powers the A318 (ATWOnline, Feb. 4), although other new parts, such as the PW1000G's combustor, have been included. "We're doing pre-product demonstrations to a level we've never done before," Saia told this website.

The final design will include 60% fewer turbine airfoils thanks to efficiencies derived from decoupling the fan from the turbine. "Even though you add 200 lb. with the gear, you basically save over 300 lb. from a nongeared engine size," Saia said (ATW, February 2008).

Both Kallman and Hess said Pratt hopes to participate in any re-engineering or replacement of the A320 and 737 but that for the time being the focus is on bringing the CSeries and MRJ to market. The positive momentum generated by LH's commitment only can help a company hit hard by the global economic downturn. Hess said engine deliveries will be "flat to actually down" this year and possibly next. P&W Canada already had announced up to 1,000 layoffs, while Hess told Reuters that Pratt and Hamilton Sundstrand plan to cut some 1,500 additional jobs this year.


Quelques récap dans la foulée...

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Lun 30 Mar 2009 - 23:07

Risque de redondance... mais risque assumé

http://www.atwonline.com/magazine/article.html?articleID=2220



Pratt & Whitney's Geared Turbofan is taking off.
By Perry Flint
East Hartford, Conn.
Air Transport World, February 2008, p.71

WITH A DEMONSTRATOR ENGINE IN ground tests and its recent selection on two new aircraft programs, Pratt & Whitney's Geared Turbofan is flying high. Last October, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries announced that the engine would be the sole powerplant on the proposed 70/90-seat Mitsubishi Regional Jet. That was followed a month later by the news that Bombardier likewise had selected it as the exclusive engine for its CSeries family of aircraft in the 110/130-seat class, pending final approvals from both boards. Although neither aircraft has been launched formally, MHI has authority to offer with a go decision expected in the first half. A decision on the CSeries also could come this year. Both airframe manufacturers are targeting a 2013 entry into service.

Commenting on the selections, Senior VP-Sales and Marketing-Large Commercial Engines Robert Keady says, "I've been with Pratt & Whitney for 29 years. I think this is the most exciting year I've seen in terms of upside potential." The wins appear to validate Pratt's strategy of investing heavily in its GTF demonstrator technology program ahead of a product selection and potentially 3-4 years before either Airbus or Boeing is ready to move forward on a next-generation narrowbody.

VP-Next Generation Product Family Robert Saia characterizes selections on the CSeries and MRJ as "very important: That was my number one assignment."

In December, Pratt announced that the GTF demonstrator successfully completed its first series of engine runs, reaching full power 30,000 lb. thrust at its test facility in West Palm Beach, Fla. As of early January the demonstrator, which is using a PW6000 core, had achieved more than 50 hr. of tests, primarily focused on "understanding the structural characteristics of the engine, looking at things like thermal systems oil systems, fuel, air temperatures [and] structural integrity," Saia tells ATW. The second series of tests, which began last month, focused on performance and noise. Perhaps as early as the end of February, the engine will be placed in its Goodrich-developed nacelle "and then what we'll do is a series of testing with that flight architecture to validate the total propulsion system for our readiness for the [flight] tests," which should begin in mid-year on Pratt's 747 flying testbed, Saia says.

Originally, Pratt focused its attention on the 20-30,000 lb. thrust class for the 737/A320 successor. Strong interest from the regional sector, however, caused it to expand downward and it now describes a family of engines in the 15-30,000 lb. thrust range. This in turn has caused it to decide on a two-core approach. The engine for the MRJ is built around a core in the 15-17,000 lb. thrust class. The second core, which was marketed to Bombardier, "has the ability to get to 27-28,000 lb. thrust class." Saia believes this core also will be well suited for the new aircraft from Boeing and Airbus. He says, "We can go above 30,000 lb. [thrust]. But where we see the requirements today, with all the focus on lightweight materials . . . to save fuel, we think the high end of this market will be about 30,000."


Big Gains

The company has set aggressive performance targets for the baseline GTF, including a 12% improvement in fuel burn (and equivalent cut in carbon dioxide emissions) and a 40% reduction in maintenance costs compared to the V2500 and CFM56-5B/7B engines in service today, with a 55% reduction in NOx emissions relative to CAEP6 and a cumulative 20 dB decrease in noise levels from Stage 4. The dramatic cut in NOx emissions comes from the rich-quench-lean TALON (Technology for Advanced Low NOx) combustor. The newest version, TALON X, is being developed in partnership with NASA for the GTF.

Central to most of the other improvements is the gear system that enables the fan to operate independently of and at a slower, more optimum speed than the low-pressure compressor and turbine. "The fan will turn at about one-third the speed of the LPT, whereas in a conventional engine the fan turns at the same speed," Saia notes. In the case of the GTF, the LPT will operate at 8,500-9,000 RPM with the fan running at approximately 2,800-3,000 RPM. This results in substantially greater efficiency and less noise at the front, while the LPC and LPT can be run at much higher speeds, likewise maximizing their efficiency. Because it is running slower, the fan and the bypass ratio can be significantly larger and the characteristic flow disruption at the tip of the blade is minimized. "The slower you can make the blade, the less loss of the actual airfoil," he explains.

Noise reduction is "a key element." Saia suggests the quietness of the GTF could result in noteworthy operational savings arising from the ability to use preferred runways and more optimum flightpaths. On a 500-nm. mission, 3 min. saved avoiding a noise abatement track results in a 3.5% fuel burn saving, he says, while the ability to use a more preferential runway can reduce fuel burn 0.4% for every minute saved.

Historically, the drawbacks to using a gearbox in a jet engine have been reliability and added weight. Pratt says neither is an issue today. Saia claims that the company's gear system adds less than 1% in weight while permitting the powerplant to be 10% lighter than today's engines. The availability of lighter materials certainly plays a role, but the savings is largely because the core can be run at its optimum speed, resulting in far more efficiency. This means fewer stages and airfoils, driving down maintenance costs as well. Today's narrowbody engines have around 3,500 LPT and LPC airfoils while the GTF will have 2,000.

Lowering the fan speed also saves weight. Saia explains: "When you slow the blade down, the impact damage of a bird or of a fan blade release is a lot less because you don't have all that velocity impact on the airfoil or on the containment case . . . We can get a lot of weight out of the fan structure just because of the lower velocity of the blade."

As for reliability, officials note that Pratt has spent more than a decade developing geared technology. "We flew our geared PropFan in 1988-89 [in cooperation with Allison] and we did a PW2000 demonstrator in 1992-93 and then we did a Pratt Canada ATFI [Advanced Turbofan Engine] in 2001-02," Saia recalls. The GTF demonstrator project got underway in 2004, which means the engine-maker will have nine years of experience before it enters service.


Fewer Fan Blades

The engine will have 18 wide-chord swept blades compared to 22 on Pratt's PW4084 for the 777 and 38 on its earlier 747-400 engine. The blades in the demonstrator are solid titanium but the company is looking at three options for production engines: Hollow titanium, a lighter hollow metallic material and a composite similar to that used in large propellers. It is working with sister company Hamilton Sundstrand on the last.

"They've been doing a lot of research and development on very large wide-chord [composite] propellers. They are responsible for the propeller on the A400M [military transport]. They've also been doing work with high-speed architecture," Saia points out. Pratt's plan is to use the lightweight metallic material for the MRJ and CSeries applications. He speculates that "it might be that we would use a lightweight metal in some thrust classes and the composite lay-up for a different thrust class," while cautioning that the company is still very much in the development stage.


Positive Response

Keady says that "very broadly and very uniformly, customer response to the GTF has been really positive . . . Since we launched first on the MRJ and subsequently with Bombardier, we have visited 50 customers. What we find is that once we've had a chance to go through technical briefings with airlines, any discussion of a barrier on the fan drive gear system quickly moves away, [with] broad acceptance that the value proposition that the engine brings is so compelling and positive." He also notes that "we've got 340 million hours of gearbox time at Pratt & Whitney."

Tests on the GTF are going well. Saia says: "We're really pleased with the rig testing we've done on the fan, the fan drive gear, the low compressor, high compressor and now at the engine level. We are well within our prediction range with results coming in within 1%-2% of what we had hoped to see. In most cases, we're actually better than what we predicted."

This engine for the CSeries will have a bypass ratio of 12 compared to 5-6 for today's narrowbody engines and 9-10 for those that power the 777 and A380. For the lower-thrust MRJ application, the BPR will be around 8, versus 5 to 5.5 or current RJ engines.

By the time a 737/A320 replacement enters service, Pratt expects to have gotten the BPR up above 20. "That's our focus," Saia states. "We laid a technology plan that goes all the way out to 2020. We are going to continue to invest in and develop capability, and this higher bypass ratio architecture will be available to Airbus and Boeing." The goal is to achieve a 1% improvement in fuel burn each year from 2013. "If we go from a [bypass ratio of] 5 to a 10 we get a 4%-5% increase; you go from a 12 to a 16 to a 20 you get another 5%-6% in reduced fuel consumption."

The company is not going it alone on the demonstrator program. In addition to Goodrich on the nacelle, MTU is the partner on the HPC and LPT, Volvo Aero is participating on the engine structure and large cases and Avio is working on the fan drive gear system. MTU recently agreed to be a 15% partner on the engines for the MRJ and CSeries, providing a combination of HPC and LPT content. Pratt is working to develop partnership agreements on these engines with the other companies as well.

Although it has placed the GTF on two smaller models, the company continues to believe that the International Aero Engines consortium in which it holds 32.5% is, in Keady's words, "the preferred route to market for the narrowbody replacement." Officials here will not speculate on what would happen if IAE's other leading shareholder, Rolls-Royce, declines to support the engine for the successor to the 737/A320 families.

For now, however, Pratt is focused on the near-term applications that could leave the blackboard this year. Saia says, "From my personal perspective, the best way to get an engineer focused on optimizing a configuration is to have a product commitment. Having secured the MRJ and the CSeries, it allows us to take all this technology we've been developing, apply it to a product, optimize that product for value for those initial applications and then build that plan for whatever the following application will be." Keady sums up: "We've been selected by MHI and we've been selected by Bombardier. Now we need to go sell them."


C'est assez complet n'est-ce pas?
De quoi susciter des réactions/analyses ?

Bonne soirée

alain57
Whisky Quebec

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par alain57 le Sam 4 Avr 2009 - 15:31

un article de plus .......nous disent pas tous...........date du mois de mars

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2009/03/06/323435/pw-signs-off-successful-gtf-flight-evaluation-effort.html

a lire sous le lien....

macintosh
Whisky Quebec

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par macintosh le Sam 4 Avr 2009 - 21:35

Bonsoir,
Voici un article paru dans FG hier, où est décrite une soumission de brevet par Airbus, visant à optimiser l'écoulement d'air autour des ailes, en présence de moteurs de large diamètre tels que le GTF, s'il devait être adapté à un appareil de type A320 (pourtant Airbus et GTF se sont prononcés contre l'éventualité d'une telle opération, pour l'instant). Le principe serait tout simplement de modifier légérement la forme de la jointure des ailes. Le coût de fabrication est faible, et cela permet de réduire la trainée et d'améliorer la manoeuvrabilité de l'avion.

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2009/04/03/324808/airbus-develops-wing-fairing-to-reduce-larger-engine-drag.html

Je comprends bien que de nombreux autres problèmes devraient être réglés avant de sortir un 320NG GTF (probablement nouveau train, re-certification partielle, etc) ; des cadres de P&W ont cité un coût d'un milliard de $. Pensez vous que malgré cela, nous aurons la surprise de voir un changement de cette politique d'ici 5 ans ? Nous savons déjà que le 320 ne sera pas remplacé avant 2020 ; mais si un 320 NG avec GTF devait être mis en service, ce ne serait probablement pas avant 2013, et cela laisserait tout de même assez peu de temps pour rentabiliser l'opération, disons 7 ou 8 ans. Est-ce assez ? Un espoir de faire aussi de la remotorisation ?

sevrien
Whisky Quebec

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par sevrien le Sam 4 Avr 2009 - 22:29

Bonsoir, Macintosh. Merci. J'ai lu les articles ici et là à ce sujet.

(i) Le problème est que P&W n'est pas seul !

(ii) On ne voit pas comment Airbus pourrait lui offrir une exclusivité.
(iii) Et Boeing ne laisserait pas faire Airbus tout seul ! Il faudrait une rivalité entre "Airframers", à armes plus ou moins égales. Idem pour les motoristes !

(iv) RR se mettrait à faire son RB285 ("Mini-Trent") à Architecture à 3 arbres, dont il sait pertinemment qu'il fera tout aussi bien, sinon mieux, en matière de "fuel-burn efficiency" / efficacité de consommation, sans risque (question d'évolution, sans révolution, avec des bases technologiques déjà maîtrisées, alors que le GTF de P&W est une solution 'plus à risque' ; on ne peut pas jauger aujourd'hui la capacité de son système de réducteur à assurer la robustesse et le "time -on-wing" requis).

(v) Il faudra un choix disponible de 2 motorisations pour les B737-NG 'modernisés' et les appareils de la famille A320, dont une motorisation 'européenne' (qui serait RR, car Safran-SNECMA et les CFM-56 sont respectivement catalogués officiellement par les Autorités Anti-Trust de l'UE comme sous-traitant du motoriste américain GE, et des produits à technologie américaine).

(vi) RR pourrait même offrir une version adaptée de son moteur RB282 à Architecture à 2 arbres, qui va motoriser le futur "medium-size biz-jet de Dassault.

(vii) La concurrence va se jouer entre GE / CFMI et P&W, comme cela s'est joué sur le B787 entre GE & P&W !

(viii) GE / CFMI (soit GE & Safran-SNECMA) sera le grand perdant ! Il est exclu que son moteur Leap56 puisse avoir l'exclusivité sur les B737-NG (et même les clients très influents de Boeing, tels que Southwest ... ) ne veulent plus de cette exclusivité !

(ix) Et GE / CFMI (soit GE & Safran-SNECMA) risque de se voir "shunter" par P&W (GTF) sur le "revamping" éventuel de la famille A320 ! Le reste de ce marché serait pour RR !

(x) La plupart des clients actuels d'IAE (du moins, ceux avec des commandes fermes en attente de livraison) préféreront, vraisemblablement, rester avec l'actuel IAE V2500, dans sa nouvelle édition, plutôt que de s'orienter vers une solution qui risque, au mieux, d'être éphémère , avant ou jusqu'à l'arrivée des "open rotors" !

(xi) De toutes façons, à ce stade, et dans la perspective de ces solutions à court terme, la question de la concurrence se joue entre les deux Américains, P&W & CFMI (GE & Safran-SNECMA) ! RR n'est pas dans la boucle de la concurrence ! Il est hors de question que les 2 motoristes américains raflent tout sur les marchés des monocouloirs concernés de Boeing et d'Airbus ! Wink

sevrien
Whisky Quebec

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par sevrien le Dim 5 Avr 2009 - 2:02

Bonsoir/ bonjour, chers tous !

Je me demande si quelqu'un peut m'aider. Je n'arrive plus à mettre la main sur un article concernant le GTF de P&W !

Voici le sens du contenu, tel que je me le rappelle :
--
(i) P&W aurait, effectivement, optimisé le système de lubrification du "réducteur", partie clé de ce concept de moteur......
-- en réduisant les quantités d'huile nécessaires dans le 'reservoir à huile',
-- et en assurant un bon refroidissement de l'huile, par le circulation du carburant, pour maintenir la qualité de cette lubrification,
-- et en éloignant tout risque de surchauffe de l'huile, avec les conséquences désagréables que celle-ci pourrait engendrer !
---------------

(ii) Mais, contrairement à ce que veut laisser entendre P&W (et cela est normal ou inévitable ! ), les économies, en terme de consommation et d'efficacité de consommation, en souffrent !

Il semblerait, selon certains analystes, que les avantages escomptés sur le plan de la consommation, soient érodés par le besoin de faire circuler et de consommer plus de carburant que prévu initialement !

Cela est possible. Et il est possible que P&W n'en ait pas trop parlé, pour des raisons évidentes. Aussi, si la rumeur est "vraie" à ce stade, il est certain que P&W doit être en train de mettre en oeuvre tous les moyens pour résoudre le problème !

Bien sûr, on espère que, dans le cas le pire, ceci n'est qu'une petite pierre d'achoppement, qui n'aura pas d'effet durable sur le projet GTF. Car le vrai problème, derrière ce genre de rumeur, serait que P&W aurait à redoubler d'efforts pour éliminer tout défaut potentiel de conception, de recherche et de réalisations (protoypes, pré-série et grande série de production! ), pour clouer le bec aux media, qui ne manqueront pas de sévir, le cas échéant !

Qui aurait vu / lu cet article, et pourrait m'en donner le lien, svp ?

Merci d'avance !

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Lun 6 Avr 2009 - 11:06

Bonjour à tous

Le champion du monde de l'intellectualisation profite de ce moment de calme sur le forum pour sévir merci cheers

Quelle est la différence entre :

1) un réducteur sur un TP400 ou un NK12 qui passent tous les deux 100% de la puissance à l'hélise soit 10-15000 cv
2) un réducteur (MTB) d'hélico, qui passe 3*4380 cv dans un Super Stallion ou 2*11000 cv dans un mil-26
3) un réducteur de GTF qui passe une fraction (>75 %) de la puissance du moteur ? Soit quelle puissance en cv?

Sachant que dans les cas 1) et 2) l'ajout de la problématique variation de pas peut conduire à des importantes variations de puissances très rapide...

En quoi finalement est-ce si difficile à fiabiliser et à alléger un réducteur ?

Comment peut-on relier besoin de circulation de fuel en refroidissement à une surconsommation ? Cela revient t'il à dire qu'il est nécessaire pour ne pas surchauffer le fioul d'en consommer en excès ?

Le réducteur du GTF constitue effectivement une pièce "originale" mais pas exceptionnelle ?

Il est effectivement possible que cela ne permette pas d'obtenir tous les gains escomptés, mais qui possède à ce jour un moteur tournant à ce niveau de SFC ? (ou autre paramètre) et qui plus est "vendu" sur un certains nombres d'avions ?

Les RB282 et 285 sont ils commercialisés ?
Quid du LeapX ?

Maintenant, il est fort possible que le GTF arrive trop tôt est qu'il ne réalise que 50% de l'amélioration attendue par les moteurs saut de génération...

Une partie du succès du GTF ne reste t'il pas lié aux prix du pétrole... s'il reste bas... et si c'est effectivement un moteur 1/2 génération d'avance... il risque de souffrir...

sevrien
Whisky Quebec

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par sevrien le Mar 7 Avr 2009 - 2:27

Bonsoir, Poncho !

Admin a écrit: Bonjour à tous

Le champion du monde de l'intellectualisation profite de ce moment de calme sur le forum pour sévir merci cheers

Quelle est la différence entre :

1) un réducteur sur un TP400 ou un NK12 qui passent tous les deux 100% de la puissance à l'hélise soit 10-15000 cv
2) un réducteur (MTB) d'hélico, qui passe 3*4380 cv dans un Super Stallion ou 2*11000 cv dans un mil-26
3) un réducteur de GTF qui passe une fraction (>75 %) de la puissance du moteur ? Soit quelle puissance en cv?
Désolé, Pöncho ! Je ne relève pas le gant ! Pas d'intellectualisation du problème pour moi ! Cela n'engage que moi ! On ne pose aucune de ces questions en ces termes-là !
Surtout pour arriver à parler de CV, ... pour un turbo-fan ! Vous passez de la rêverie aux "fun facts". Very Happy

Cela n'est pas mauvais en soi. Mais, pour des échanges de Forum, je n'y vais pas ! Un éminent contributeur, mais rare dans ses écrits, m'a fait la démonstration de comment faire l'équivalence entre des CV et des lbs ou K-Newton de poussée. Je lui ai promis que je ne reproduirais jamais un mot pour diffusion publique, et surtout pas sur un Forum aéronautique. Je ne me sens pas de taille pour entrer dans ces considérations, surtout qu'on ne semble jamais y rentrer en ces termes !

Les Frenz, vonrichthoffen et TRIM2, par exemple, et d'autres encore que j'oublie ou ne connais pas, pourraient , sans doute, s'y amuser à coeur joie. Pas mon cas !
...................
Admin a écrit: En quoi finalement est-ce si difficile à fiabiliser et à alléger un réducteur ?
Si ce n'était pas difficile, cela se saurait, & P&W n'aurait pas passé plus de 20 ans pour ne produire jusqu'ici qu'une poignée de prototypes, véritables bijoux, de nature artisanale, qui ne le seront pas (c'est à dire, qui seront "moins bijoux") lors des productions en "pré-industrialisation" / "pré-séries", sans parler de la phase "production à pleine cadence"!

Et hélas, P&W a un historique de mauvaises expériences er de non-qualité, même récemment encore, avec les les moteurs PW6000, .....qui n'ont pas eu, ... loin s'en faut, le succès escompté sur les A318 !

Les FADEC vont jouer un rôle crucial. Encore cette histpoire d'ensembles à la fois distincts mais liés, et qui sont condamnés à "inter-agir" ! Ne pas oublier l'approche "big picture" / 'image globale' !

Vous devriez savoir que c'est RR qui a inventé le système FADEC. Il aurait dû le breveter (l'erreur est humaine) ! Mais le monde ne lui aurait pas forcément permis un tel monopole !

Posez-vous la question : "Pourquoi RR n'a-t-il jamais eu de problème FADEC dans les opérations commerciales? Alors que P&W n'a toujours pas guéri son problème de "surge" / 'pompage' (sur PW séries 2000 & 4000), .... et que GE a fréquemment eu les mêmes problèmes, résultant en des "double flame-out" sur CF-6?"

Pourquoi GE a-t-il eu des "roll-back" lors des décollages, y compris (surtout) sur GE90-115B (B777-300ER) ? Et pour ces derniers, qu'on ne vienne pas nous empoisonner avec une histoire d'algorithme impur ! Là n'est pas le problème ! Le problème / "la root cause" est l'injection de la non-qualité ! Quelqu'un n'a pas son job de "making sure" (vérification et re-vérification). Il y avait vice de procédure et dans l'application de la procédure, chez GE ou ses "auteurs" de logiciel !

Il semble que RR n'ait jamais eu un cas de "engine-induced or FADEC-induced surge"!
GE et P&W ont eu surtout cela !

RR, sur Concorde, par exemple, n'a eu (très rarement, d'ailleurs) que du "fuel-induced" ou "fuel-system induced surge". Tout comme il e eu du "fuel- / fuel-system- induced roll-back" (sur les Trent 800) ; pas de FADEC ou engine-induced "roll-back" !

Malgré ses grandes qualités, P&W n'a visiblement pas vraiment maîtrisé tous les coins & recoins du FADEC. D'aillleurs, avec ce risque de "surge", c'est un des grands points faibles de l'offre Boeing dans le contexte des avions ravitailleurs ! Idem pour l'offre NG-EADS, avec le GE CF-6, moteur dont personne ne veut plus ! Et cela tue les valeurs résiduelles de tous les avions à moteurs CF-6 !
--------------------------

Pour la fiabilité du GTF, voici les points de soucis :
--
---- Les remarques que j'ai pu fournir, en oct. ou nov. 2008, sur le GTF ont été appuyés comme suit (et ceci va dans le sens de ce que TRIM2 avait écrit, et ce que j'ai pu ajouter) :
-- pour le GTF, il y a , bien sur, le problème de l'assurance qualité / robustesse du réducteur fabriqué en grande série ; la lubrification ne serait pas un problème (aspect 'sous contrôle', très bien maîtrisé), selon P&W, mais qui est obligé de reconnaître beaucoup de casse en cours de route ;
-- aussi, P&W vise deux objectifs qui s'accompagnent, ... légèreté du moteur, et contrôle du poids du réducteur pour la compacité du moteur ;

-- car P&W reconnaît une certaine supériorité technique de l'architecture à 3 arbres, qui offre autant ou plus de puissance / poussée pour moins de poids et plus de compacité, et meilleure rétention d'efficacité, ce qui donne plus de "time on wing" et entretien moins onéreux (certains auteurs, sur d'autres Forum, ici et là, pourraient commencer à avoir le bon sens, l'humilité et l'objectivité de reconnaître l'avis d'un motoriste professionnel tel que P&W sur ces questions, et 'pair' de GE & de RR) ;
-- ce faisant, P&W veut privilégier la minceur / manque d'épaisseur du réducteur, et, par là doit reconnaître certains risques sur le plan de la robustesse.

-- un ingénieur de RR a dit que ceci génère l'inconvénient suivant (qui explique, aussi, pourquoi RR n'a pas cherché à poursuivre ses propres études du GTF) :
-- une petite erreur dans l'équation ne se traduit pas par une simple usure légèrement plus rapide de la pièce, nécessitant un ou deux remplacements de plus que le nombre visé dans un "full life cycle" / cycle de vie complet ;


-- cela se traduit par la fracture très tôt, et sans préavis, ......et en général, il y aurait des pièces qui se "fracassent" ;
-- ce qui est très gênant, ... c'est que, compte tenu de la mécanique de précision dont il s'agit, bien que la pièce soit modifiable, le nouveau standard nécessaire aura de telles répercussions sur "l'équilibre & l'équilibrage du moteur", que le travail sur le réducteur seul pourrait ne pas suffire ; et cela imposerait un travail de rattrapage long, lourd et coûteux sur le réducteur et le moteur !

-- Enfin,, étant donné les calendriers, et l'arrivée vers 2020 /2022 de "l'open rotor", il y a un réel risque d'une vie effective courte pour le GTF, surtout si, comme cela est visé, les "mini 3-spool" (RB285) révèle plus de potentialités que RR n'ose (par prudence) espérer aujourd'hui !

Admin a écrit: Comment peut-on relier besoin de circulation de fuel en refroidissement à une surconsommation ? Cela revient t'il à dire qu'il est nécessaire pour ne pas surchauffer le fioul d'en consommer en excès ?
Votre question réfléchit trop d'intellectualisation, et un oubli de ce qui existe et est connu déjà ! Wink
Voici quelques remarques, pour le moment. Nous y reviendrons, dans des posts ultérieurs.

Dans les avions de ligne et les moteurs qui les propulsent, tout est articulé autour d'ensembles, distincts mais liés, qui influent les uns sur les autres dans leur interaction permanente. Ceci nécessite des compromis, dont la finesse et la rigueur doivent être encore plus soigneusement dosées, en raison des contraintes juridiques, environnementales etc. Il n'y a pas 'l'absolutisme" des avions de chasse.

Dans l'aviation civile , par rapport à celle du monde militaire, il y a des contrastes tout comme il en existe entre les voitures de grande diffusion, et les Formule 1 !

Déja, RR, artiste s'il en fût, en matière d'équilibres au sein des moteurs, et de contrôle / de gestion thermique, a constaté, dans sa modélisation, des températures bien plus élévées dans l'environnement du réducteur du moteur GTF, que dans celui des TGB pour ses moteurs à Architectuire à 2 arbres, ... ou à 3 arbres !

Voilà déjà un problème ! Il s'agit bien de refroidir l'huile, et non pas de privilégier une stratégie de réchauffer le kérosène !
Aussi, pour optimiser le réducteur et sa lubrification, il faut avoir une couche d'huile bien fine, à bonne viscosité, à caractéristiques adaptées de façon constante. Ils'agit d'avoir une masse volumique des plus faibles, pour permettre son refroidissement / rafraîchissement éfficace et constante, par le passage du kérosène froide dans l'evironnement du réducteur.

Problème potentiel, difficile à maïtriser : s'il y a un léger défaut de fabrication ou d'usure prématurée dans le réducteur, le "degré de perfection" des surfaces à lubrifier, pourra être altéré, avec une croissance de chaleur, plutôt que la maîtrise de la température ! Danger ! Risque de la séquzence infernale : surchauffe de l'huile, viscosité altérée, risque de "brûlures" entre les pièces mouvantes, avec les conséquences qu'on peut imaginer

A contrario, s'il y a trop de différence entre la température respective du kérosène et de l'huile, avec les rtisques que cela présente en terme de condensation, ce sera la "totale" : risque de formation de glace et de restriction de "fuel flow", et, pendant que la glace fondra, si tel est le cas, la circulation restreinte / ralentie du kérosène pourrait laisser grimper indument la température de l'huile, avec risque de ruptuire et d'IFSD !

Il faut tout de même se poser la question, ...... "Pourquoi P&W veut limiterses premières opérations avec le GTF auX courts / moyens courrier" ?

Le risque de formation de glace va devenir de plus en plus important sur les vols long-courrier !
-----------------------------------

On arrête là, pour le moment ! Le post ci-dessus est déjà trop lourd ! Wink

sevrien
Whisky Quebec

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par sevrien le Mar 7 Avr 2009 - 8:33

Bonjour, chers tous, et Poncho. Pour traiter les autres questions.

Admin a écrit:
Les RB282 et 285 sont ils commercialisés ?

Le RB282 oui, ... dans ce sens qu'il a été "libéré" (par décision officielle des tous les Conseils d'Admin. (CA) concernés du Groupe RR), 'pour offre' ("Authorisation to Offer").
Il a été proposé, dans le cadre d'un 'appel d'offres international', fait par Dassault, pour son futur "Medium -size Biz-Jet"), et il a été retenu en exclusivité, Dasault ayant progressivement éliminé toutrs les offres de tous les autres concurrents !
Le projet ast au ralenti, pendant cette crise, mais les travaux continuent, notamment pour utiliser la crise dans le but d'améliorer et "airframe" & moteur.

Le RB285 n'a pas été lancé officellement, par la formalité des CA en vue de "authorisation to offer", ... mais tous les acteurs se doutent que, si cela devenait nécessaire, l'autorisation serait donnée !

Les désignations RB282 er RB285, pourront être maintenues ou modifiées.
----------------------
Admin a écrit: Quid du LeapX ?

Les teste sont en cours (prolongrmrnt des phases R&D & R&T). Mais cela ne passionne pas le marché, à ce stade.
Admin a écrit: Maintenant, il est fort possible que le GTF arrive trop tôt est qu'il ne réalise que 50% de l'amélioration attendue par les moteurs saut de génération...

Une partie du succès du GTF ne reste t'il pas lié aux prix du pétrole... s'il reste bas... et si c'est effectivement un moteur 1/2 génération d'avance... il risque de souffrir...
Evidemment, ... ! Cela est certain ! Et c'est pour clea que les responsables du projet chez P&W cherchent par tous les moyens, a publier de manière attractive et non mensongère, des gains supplémentaires en efficacité de consommation !

Affaire à suivre !

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Mar 7 Avr 2009 - 8:47

Merci cher Sevrien...

Quelques éléments au passage péchés lors de mes lectures pour me renseigner sur le MD-11

flight Int'l 20-26 juin 1990 : "ADP Planetary gear goes to prototype"

Advances Ducted Pro : gamme de poussée 53 000 lbsf, puissance transmise au réducteur : 40 000 cv...

Autre référence : http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_6712/is_n34_v177/ai_n28618295

PW1000G -> classe 15-30 000 lbf ...une règle de trois donne une gamme de puissance à transmettre par le réducteur de 11 000 à 22 000 cv...
Et je dis donc que c'est une gamme connue au moins pour quelques hélicoptères ... et explorée depuis longtemps avec le NK12...

Voilà donc pour les fun facts et la réverie... enquete

Tout à fait d'accord pour dire que ce n'est pas forcément simple Wink de réaliser un réducteur, mais le réducteur est né avec la turbine... le jour où on a remplacé les "reciprocating engines"...
Il me semble donc qu'à ce stade, intellectualiser permet aussi de remettre en perspective les enjeux et jauger les sauts technologiques prévoir....
Et pour moi c'est simple, mais c'est dpo , le GTF explore une gamme de puissance dans les réducteur qui est connnue... et donc avec un risque limité ... ce qui permet de se focaliser sur l'optimisation de la pièce.
Me dire si je me trompe !


Pour le reste, la limitation aux courts et moyens courrier découle certainement de ce que déroule ci-avant... à moins que derrière cette question il y ait des sources bien cachées Wink



-- cela se traduit par la fracture très tôt, et sans préavis, ......et en général, il y aurait des pièces qui se "fracassent" ;

Cela traduit bien, me semble t'il, les rupture sur les TGB des GE90-115... Wink

Je pense que l'avis d'Alain57 sur les transmissions pourrait aussi être intéressant... vu son expérience pratique dans le domaine.

Enfin, je pense, à titre personnel, que les déboires de GE et PW méritent largement un sujet séparé... notamment sur le PW4000-94... d'après ce que j'ai pu lire (tjs flight int'l 20-26 juin 1990 entre autre...).
Même si c'est peut-être de l'histoire ancienne, c'est bigrement intéressant (en tout cas pour moi)

Voilà, cher Sevrien, mon avis et ma démarche.


NB : je n'ai pas lu votre second message en rédigeant celui-ci

sevrien
Whisky Quebec

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par sevrien le Mar 7 Avr 2009 - 12:08

Bonjour, poncho !
Admin a écrit: Merci cher Sevrien...

Quelques éléments au passage péchés lors de mes lectures pour me renseigner sur le MD-11

flight Int'l 20-26 juin 1990 : "ADP Planetary gear goes to prototype"

Advances Ducted Pro : gamme de poussée 53 000 lbsf, puissance transmise au réducteur : 40 000 cv...*
Je ne conteste pas cela ! Mais il s'agissait d'un moteur dit "ducted Fan", non pas d'un turbo-fan ! Rien de plus normal de rester dans les mêmes unités de mesure pour le même concept ! Le moteur en question correspond plus au concept d'avion à "propeller" / "à moteur à hélice caréné" ("ducted prop-fan") qu'à un "turbo-fan" ("jet") !
Admin a écrit:Autre référence : http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_6712/is_n34_v177/ai_n28618295

PW1000G -> classe 15-30 000 lbf ...une règle de trois donne une gamme de puissance à transmettre par le réducteur de 11 000 à 22 000 cv...
Et je dis donc que c'est une gamme connue au moins pour quelques hélicoptères ... et explorée depuis longtemps avec le NK12...

Voilà donc pour les fun facts et la réverie... enquete
Voir remarque ci-dessus. Wink

Admin a écrit: Tout à fait d'accord pour dire que ce n'est pas forcément simple Wink de réaliser un réducteur, mais le réducteur est né avec la turbine... le jour où on a remplacé les "reciprocating engines"...
Il me semble donc qu'à ce stade, intellectualiser permet aussi de remettre en perspective les enjeux et jauger les sauts technologiques prévoir....
Il est plus intéressant de contacter RR, qui, comme je l'ai écrit souvent, et le répète, maîtrise parfaitement le concept qu'est la GFT ("Geared Fan Technology"). RR a réussi à modéliser le GTF, et en connaît les pièges et difficultés à surmonter ! P&W maîtrise bien mieux la réalisation, à ce stade, que ne pourrait RR.
Mais à quel prix ?
RR et, par exemple, SNECMA, n'ont tout simplement pas les ressources à mettre dans un projet pareil, qui, en fin de compte, est un investissement dans un "game-changer" (par rapport à des moteurs à Architecture à 2 Arbres, mais surtout pas par rapport à des moteurs à Architecture à 3 arbres, .... ce dernier ayant encore d'énormes gisements de progrès, qui seront développés et exploités entre aujourd'hui et 2050 à 2060).
Le concept GTf à (relativement) haut risque, que P&W peut financer, grâce à ses propres ressources colossales, mais surtout, aussi, aux moyens de financement en soutien que sont ceux du Groupe UTC, auquel appartient P&W ! Les grandes potentialités des moteurs à Architecture à 3 arbres (j'y reviendrai, dans des posts séparés) montrent une voie de progrès à risque faible et maîtrisé, pour un coût relativement faible de développement et de mise au point !

La mise au point du GTF de P&W a déjà coûté cher, et va le faire encore ! Et, s'il y a des pépins (et il y en aura), il faut penser à la valeur résiduelle des avions qui en seront équipés, surtout après une courte "demi-vie", vraisemblablement, avant l'arrivée des "open rotors" ! Et il faut cesser de dénigrér les "open rotors", notamment pour leur bruit !

Ceux qui le font ne se rendent même pas compte des bêtises qu'ils racontent ! RR aurait, paraît-il, déjà atteint une performance en bruit, qui améliore (tout juste) bon nombre des moteurs ("turbo-fans") d'aujourd'hui !
Admin a écrit: Et pour moi c'est simple, mais c'est dpo ,
Il est toujours simple d'intellectualiser les problèmes ! Bien plus difficle de les résoudre de manière concrète & pragmatique !

Admin a écrit: le GTF explore une gamme de puissance dans les réducteur qui est connnue... et donc avec un risque limité ... ce qui permet de se focaliser sur l'optimisation de la pièce.
Me dire si je me trompe !
Ce n'est pas faux ! Mais, ... à quel prix, ..... et quid de la valeur résiduelle qui intéresse le client ?
Admin a écrit: Pour le reste, la limitation aux courts et moyens courrier découle certainement de ce que déroule ci-avant... à moins que derrière cette question il y ait des sources bien cachées Wink
Le risque est pour GE & Safran-SNECMA (CFMI). C'est pour cela que RR est ravi de voir P&W s'attaquer à ce segment du marché, avec tant d'acharnement, qui éloigne GE d'autres réflexions !

Mais le vrai objectif à terme de P&W est un retour crédible au marché des "gros porteurs", avec une offre de moteur moderne à forte poussée !
-- cela se traduit par la fracture très tôt, et sans préavis, ......et en général, il y aurait des pièces qui se "fracassent" ;
Admin a écrit: Cela traduit bien, me semble t'il, les rupture sur les TGB des GE90-115... Wink
Poncho, ...bien vu ! Mais ce n'est pas la peine de mélanger les genres, dans ce domaine, même avec humour ! La planète aéronautique toute entière sait que GE ne réalise pas facilement ses "fixes", parce que, si souvent, il faut qu'il travaille en rattrapage sur des produits, susceptibles d'être excellents, mais, comme je l'ai dit, si souvent gâchés par des erreurs dans le "supply chain", ou par un "cocktail d’un moteur et de ses accessoires mal conçus, mal réalisés, ... bâclés,… donc ".

Pour ce qui est du GTF, le point à retenir n'est pas vraiment que les pièces se fracassent, .... mais qu'il n'y aura pas (ou seulment très peu) de préavis, soit de signes précurseurs de la panne touchant le réducteur et le moteur !

Je cite TRIM2 :
-- "Bonjour à tous,
Entièrement d'accord avec le post de sevrien.
Le risque, dans le réducteur du PW-GTF, est la rupture imprévisible, comme dans certains GE...
Bien plus grave qu'une usure quantifiée et pouvant être incluse dans une maintenance prédictive."


Invité
Invité

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par Invité le Mar 28 Avr 2009 - 19:35

Pratt & Whitney va utiliser la nacelle du 787 comme base de développement de celle du GTF.

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2009/04/28/325749/pratt-whitney-to-use-787-nacelle-as-baseline-for-gtf.html

art_way
Whisky Charlie

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par art_way le Mer 20 Mai 2009 - 11:10

Article très intéressant...et/ou effet Bourget ?

P&W sees GTF architecture as viable for nextgen widebodies

Pratt & Whitney (P&W) has not found any thrust limitations
to its geared turbofan engine architecture, and believes its design is
capable of powering the next generation of widebody aircraft, including
Boeing's replacement for the 777 if such an aircraft is pursued.The manufacturer's PW1000G has already been selected by Bombardier to power the 110/130-seat CSeries and by Mitsubishi to power the Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ). The
CSeries will be powered with the 20,000lb-24,000lb thrust class
PW1000G, designated the PW1500G, while the MRJ will be powered with the
PW1200G, which offers thrust between 13,000lb and 17,000lb.P&W's
initial product definition for its geared engine architecture
represents a technology level that is targeted to a 2013
entry-into-service for both the CSeries and MRJ. However, late
last year the company launched its second phase of technology
development, which is really targeted for aircraft that will enter
service in the 2015-2020 time period. "Our objective, our goal
is to improve fuel consumption in the order of 1% to 1.5% per year for
each year of time. So if we were to go from 2013 to 2018, we have set a
target to have fuel reduction in 8%-10% step change or improvement
regime," P&W vice-president next generation product family Bob Saia
told consultancy Innovation Analysis Group (IAG) in an exclusive
interview that aired on 6 May.With regard to power, there are
"some basic fundamental elements associated with higher thrust that
we're developing for a 30,000lb thrust class or even a 35,000lb thrust
class so as Boeing and Airbus
look at their next generation products and as they define requirements
which we know will drive higher thrust, we will be able to add
incremental benefit for our geared architecture at that higher thrust".However,
P&W has "tested up to 40,000lb of thrust, and we've run the test up
to that level to ensure that we cleared any thrust requirement for this
next generation of aircraft that will operate up to about 250
passengers", says Saia.A 40,000lb thrust engine is capable of powering an aircraft like the Boeing 757, which requires 37,000lb to 38,000lb of thrust, notes Saia. "So we have covered that type of thrust requirement."To
date, however, P&W has not found any thrust limitations "that would
prevent us from using this geared architecture to even a twin-engined,
long-range aircraft like a Boeing 777 or an Airbus A350".P&W
is not targeting the A350. And the reason for that, says Saia, is that
"if you wanted to really optimize the gear, you'd really like to start
with a brand new paper airplane at the same time so then you have the
ability to optimize both the aircraft, the structure, the positioning
of the engine, and the engine design all in that design phase". If, for example, a replacement aircraft was being designed for today's Boeing 777 "then certainly we believe a geared architecture would be a very viable offering for that kind of airplane", says Saia.P&W
does not rule out installing a geared engine on existing aircraft if
the aircraft is expected to be in production for another five to ten
years. But Saia points out that the business economics don't fully
support re-engining aged aircraft versus a re-fresh of a production
variant because re-engining involves adding a new nacelle and a new
pylon, in addition to a new engine. He adds: "We believe that
as we evolve and get more testing under these early programmes that
we've launched that we will have the ability of installing a geared
architecture in a next generation widebody aircraft that would happen
post-2018, 2020 so it would not be any of the aircraft certainly either
being designed or in service today."
http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2009/05/20/326754/pw-sees-gtf-architecture-as-viable-for-nextgen-widebodies.html
La prochaine génération de GTF serai capable d'alimenter les nouveaux 777 affraid optimiste PW !!


_________________
art_way

sevrien
Whisky Quebec

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par sevrien le Mer 20 Mai 2009 - 18:05

Bonjour, art_way ! Je vais répondre en deux temps, pour éviter de faire un post unique, trop long et trop lourd.

Hélas, je vais faire un peu l'iconoclaste ! Pas question de dénigrer P&W ! J'applaudis leur effort ! Mais contrairement à ceux qui se produisent, ici et là, en proclamant la GFT ("Geared Fan Technology") comme la "saving grace" des moteurs d'avions, et le GTF de P&W comme le meilleur produit depuis le fil à couper le beurre, je reste prudent, pour des raisons fondées.

Dans les considérations d'ordre général, ne pas oublier que RR comprend parfaitement la technologie GFT ! RR aurait fait de nouvelles analyses même récemment du GTF. Même conclusion que par le passé. Le réducteur serait problématique, car :
-- la lubrification (si importante) de cette pièce, faite "artisanalement" jusqu'ici, comme une véritable pièce de joaillerie, exploit d'orfèvrerie industrielle, ne pourra vraisemblablement pas, avant très longtemps, atteindre le même degré d'efficacité que celle qui protège la très haute qualité des prototypes d'aujourd'hui (qualité qui facilite la lubrification, entre autres) ;
-- la capacité à résister à / à 'évacuer' la chaleur doit être forte ;
-- les résistance et durabilité de cette pièce doivent être "prévisibles" ("predictable") ;
-- l'entretien ne doit pas être onéreux, voire prohibitif.

Or, RR dit que qu'il y aura la tentation de surdimensionner les robustesse et sécurité au niveau de cette pièce (d'où, inéluctablement : surpoids ; pas grave au niveau du poids de l'avion, mais gênant en terme de son poids relatif par rapport au poids du moteur.

Même crainte en ce qui concerne la "predictability" du comportement de la pièce ! Quasiment impossible d'avoir un préavis valable avant qu'une pièce "fatigué" ou de qualité légèrement défaillante ne se fracasse !

Résultat ? Tentation d'aller vers une solution d'augmentation de la fréquence des interventions d'entretien 'clé', ce qui est le contraire de l'objectif déclaré, et, par là, contreproductif !
art_way a écrit:Article très intéressant...et/ou effet Bourget ?

P&W sees GTF architecture as viable for nextgen widebodies.

Pas exactement. Voici le problème. P&W se trouve muni d'une offre apparemment de qualité, & à fort potential d'intérêt pour le marché, .... mais au mauvais moment, en raisoin :
-- de la crise, et du positionnement des cycles des avions ou "applications" susceptibles d'accueillir les nouveaux moteurs dits "GTF" de P&W,
-- et de la situation et de la perpsective "vacillante" ou "non consolidée" (dans les court & moyen terme), pour ces moteurs,
-- bien cantonnés dans les limités stratégiques de poussée, dixées délibérément par
P&W, dans une décision de bon sens, pragmatique et réaliste.
The manufacturer's PW1000G has already been selected by Bombardier to power the 110/130-seat CSeries and by Mitsubishi to power the Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ). The
CSeries will be powered with the 20,000lb-24,000lb thrust class
PW1000G, designated the PW1500G, while the MRJ will be powered with the
PW1200G, which offers thrust between 13,000lb and 17,000lb.P&W's
initial product definition for its geared engine architecture
represents a technology level that is targeted to a 2013
entry-into-service for both the CSeries and MRJ.

Là, il y a un peu de malchance !
-- Le moteur de P&W prévu à la base du developpement pour le MRJ-90 est celui qui va équiper le Cessna Columbus ! Eh bien, ..... lire la nouvelle (le secteur "Corporate Aviation" est sérieusement sécoué en ce moment ; aucun acteur n'y échappe) :
Lien :
http://www.aerocontact.com/actualite_aeronautique_spatiale/ac-cessna-suspend-le-developpement-du-columbus~08049.html
Cessna suspend le développement du Columbus !
Le moment du lancement n’est pas venu. Cessna a suspendu le programme Citation Columbus le 29 avril, en raison des difficultés que rencontre le constructeur américain avec la crise économique. Il souhaite ainsi se focaliser sur les produits déjà existants et qui ont fait leurs preuves.

Le Columbus n’est cependant pas complètement abandonné. Il est en effet prévu que son développement reprenne dès que les conditions du marché s’améliorent.

N'avoir qu'une application pour le développement d'un "core" de moteur, pour des appareils, somme toute, de marché de niche, n'est pas idéal : Columbus et MRJ-90 ! Et le problème est que le marché des Regional Jets va être aussi touché que celui de la "Corporate Aviation" !

Aussi, on ne peut pas dire que le marché des CSeries, qui va accueillir le PW1000G, soit tibuste ou consolidé !

Ce qui précède oblige P&W à réfléchir, et à communiquer !

A suivre, dans un post ci-dessous ! Wink


Dernière édition par sevrien le Mer 20 Mai 2009 - 21:44, édité 1 fois

sevrien
Whisky Quebec

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par sevrien le Mer 20 Mai 2009 - 19:19

La suite !
Pratt & Whitney (P&W) has not found any thrust limitations
to its geared turbofan engine architecture, and believes its design is
capable of powering the next generation of widebody aircraft, including
Boeing's replacement for the 777 if such an aircraft is pursued.

La perspective devant la stratégie retenue à ce stade par P&W, articulée autour des poussées 'faibles à très modérées' ("low to low-mid-thrust"... ), est morose ! P&W avait voulu assurer une entrée "à big-bang" pour ses GTF dans ce créneau, de manière à montrer qu'il était en train de regagner son ticket d'entrée dans le marché des Turbofan 'à forte poussée' / "high thrust Turbofans".
Cette perspective morose l'oblige à accélérer le mouvement, pour se rappeler au bon souvenir des Cies. qui ont dû se contenter principalement des produits des deux autres "grands", GE & RR !

P&W a consenti des investissements colossaux dans cette première étape, qui s'est faite dans la douleur & la difficulté ! Il veut consolider dès que possible un retour sur investissement et la reconnaissance positive du marché pour ses efforts, basé, tout de même, sur une technologie nouvelle !

La morosité des segments choisi pour le retour "convaincant" est un handicap ! P&W se sent obligé de "brusquer le mouvement", popur maintenir l'élan ! L'ouverture à chercher est celle du marché des "Turbofans à forte poussée", soit pour les applications "gtos porteurs" !

Il convient de l'applaudir !
However, late last year the company launched its second phase of technology
development, which is really targeted for aircraft that will enterservice in the 2015-2020 time period. "Our objective, our goalis to improve fuel consumption in the order of 1% to 1.5% per year foreach year of time. So if we were to go from 2013 to 2018, we have set atarget to have fuel reduction in 8%-10% step change or improvementregime," P&W vice-president next generation product family Bob Saiatold consultancy Innovation Analysis Group (IAG) in an exclusive interview that aired on 6 May.

C'est un objectif déclaré, ... ni plus ni moins ! Mais ceux qui croient que P&W est le seul capable de le réaliser, ... se trompent lourdement ! RR & G E seront sur les rangs ! Rt is y seront ! Et même P&W reconnaît qu'il n'arrivera pas à faire un moteur rivalisant avec cle RB285 (à Architecutre trois arbres, notamment), et ayant la compacité de ce dernier !
With regard to power, there are "some basic fundamental elements associated with higher thrust that we're developing for a 30,000lb thrust class or even a 35,000lb thrust class so as Boeing and Airbus look at their next generation products and as they define requirements, which we know will drive higher thrust, we will be able to add
incremental benefit for our geared architecture at that higher thrust".

Normal ! Mais bien vu !
However, P&W has "tested up to 40,000lb of thrust, and we've run the test up
to that level to ensure that we cleared any thrust requirement for this next generation of aircraft that will operate up to about 250 passengers", says Saia.

A 40,000lb thrust engine is capable of powering an aircraft like the Boeing 757, which requires 37,000lb to 38,000lb of thrust, notes Saia. "So we have covered that type of thrust requirement."

Oui ! Et personne n'a oublié que c'est dans cette fourchette de pousée que RR, avec ses RR RB211-535-E4), a taillé les croupières à P&W (et des PW séries 2000, ... PW2037, .....2040.....2043)
To date, however, P&W has not found any thrust limitations "that would
prevent us from using this geared architecture to even a twin-engined,
long-range aircraft like a Boeing 777 or an Airbus A350".

Un raccourci pour nous dire que nous allons / pourrons voir (bientôt) le retour de P&W, dans le marché des Gros-Porteurs à moteurs à Forte Poussée ! C'est GE qui se sentira "attaqué".
P&W is not targeting the A350. And the reason for that, says Saia, is that
"if you wanted to really optimize the gear, you'd really like to start
with a brand new paper airplane at the same time so then you have the
ability to optimize both the aircraft, the structure, the positioning
of the engine, and the engine design all in that design phase".

A noter, svp !
If, for example, a replacement aircraft was being designed for today's Boeing 777 "then certainly we believe a geared architecture would be a very viable offering for that kind of airplane", says Saia.

P&W does not rule out installing a geared engine on existing aircraft if the aircraft is expected to be in production for another five to ten years. But Saia points out that the business economics don't fully support re-engining aged aircraft versus a re-fresh of a production variant because re-engining involves adding a new nacelle and a new
pylon, in addition to a new engine.

C'est le problème du "Business Case", et la possibilité de le boucler !
He adds: "We believe that as we evolve and get more testing under these early programmes that we've launched that we will have the ability of installing a geared
architecture in a next generation widebody aircraft that would happen post-2018, 2020 so it would not be any of the aircraft certainly either being designed or in service today."
http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2009/05/20/326754/pw-sees-gtf-architecture-as-viable-for-nextgen-widebodies.html

L'intention y est ! Et P&W, avec UTC en appui, en a largement les moyens ! Laughing

art_way
Whisky Charlie

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par art_way le Mer 20 Mai 2009 - 19:28

Merci pour votre analyse Sevrien.


_________________
art_way

Invité
Invité

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par Invité le Mer 20 Mai 2009 - 19:40

Mais sur ce sujet je me pose deux questions :
.. a-t-on les résultats des essais faits sur le 340. Je me demande si cette absence de données ne cache pas quelque chose que'aucuns veuillent effacer derrière de la communication.
.. est-il facile de monter en puissance par une simple homotéte des solutions? PW va rencontrer des contraintes de charge. Non ?

sevrien
Whisky Quebec

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par sevrien le Mer 20 Mai 2009 - 23:35

Bonsoir, Jeannot !
Jeannot a écrit: Mais sur ce sujet je me pose deux questions :
.. a-t-on les résultats des essais faits sur le 340. Je me demande si cette absence de données ne cache pas quelque chose que'aucuns veuillent effacer derrière de la communication.
Bien sûr, .... 'on' a les résultats, .... mais 'on' n'est pas le grand public !
Sans vouloir chercher la polémique, il y a des choses qu'on n'a pas trop envie de diffuser :
-- (a) Airbus & P&W ne sont pas sur la même longueur d'onde ;
-- (b) P&W aurait cherché à tirer des conclusions orientées vers l'espoir d'inciter Airbus à lancer un genre de variante bâtarde (vb) de la famille A320, en attendant les vrais remplaçants de ces monocouloirs (espoir, aussi, d'une opération équivalente sur B737NG) ;
-- (c) ceci aurait posé des problèmes, car le moteur essayé sur le FTB A340-600 serait réputé ne pas correspondre à celui qui pourrait être, les cas échéant, monté, sur l'ailes des variantes bâtardes précitées ;
-- (d) les données ne seraient, donc, pas validables pour les applications visées !

De toutes façons, Bob SAIA de P&W est lucide à cet égard ! Rappel :
--P&W does not rule out installing a geared engine on existing aircraft if the aircraft is expected to be in production for another five to ten years. But Saia points out that the business economics don't fully support re-engining aged aircraft versus a re-fresh of a production variant because re-engining involves adding a new nacelle and a new pylon, in addition to a new engine.
Et nous avions ajouté : C'est le problème du "Business Case", et la possibilité de le boucler !

Aussi, ne pas oublier le train d'atterrissage (tiges plus longues?) et les "wheel -wells" (à élargier, et, peut-être, à repositionner, par rapport au fuselage), ...... et toutes les répercussions, que ceci pourrait engendrer sur les émissions de bruit !

Si la durée de vie effective de ces vb devait être condamnée à être plutôt courte, avant l'arrivée des vrais remplaçants (des familles B737NG et A320 d'Airbus), de conception d'une génération tout à fait différente, ceci donnerait immédiatement un air "d'avion orphelin" à ces vb! Quid de l'impact sur la valeur résiduelle des familles B737NG et A320 ?

Jeannot a écrit: .. est-il facile de monter en puissance par une simple homotéte des solutions? PW va rencontrer des contraintes de charge. Non ?
Là, je n'ai aucune idée ! J'aurais tendance à dire, 'Ni simple, ... ni facile' !
Mais il faudrait demander à nos amis vonrichthoffen ou TRIM2, par exemple !

Beochien
Whisky Charlie

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par Beochien le Dim 24 Mai 2009 - 2:47

Un article bien intéressant ... pour y revenir !
peut être les grandes manoeuvres qui commencent pour le Bourget !

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2009/05/20/326754/pw-sees-gtf-architecture-as-viable-for-nextgen-widebodies.html
However, late last year the company launched its second phase of
technology development, which is really targeted for aircraft that will
enter service in the 2015-2020 time period.
"Our objective, our
goal is to improve fuel consumption in the order of 1% to 1.5% per year
for each year of time. So if we were to go from 2013 to 2018, we have
set a target to have fuel reduction in 8%-10% step change or
improvement regime," P&W vice-president next generation product
family Bob Saia told consultancy Innovation Analysis Group (IAG) in an
exclusive interview that aired on 6 May.
With regard to power,
there are "some basic fundamental elements associated with higher
thrust that we're developing for a 30,000lb thrust class or even a
35,000lb thrust
class so as Boeing and Airbus

look at their next generation products and as they define requirements
which we know will drive higher thrust, we will be able to add
incremental benefit for our geared architecture at that higher thrust".However,
P&W has "tested up to 40,000lb of thrust, and we've run the test up
to that level to ensure that we cleared any thrust requirement for this
next generation of aircraft that will operate up to about 250
passengers", says Saia.


--------------------
Juste qq commentaires !
Bob Saïa n'est pas n'importe qui chez P&W !

Bob Saia is Pratt & Whitney’s Vice President, Next Generation
Product Family. Bob leads an interdisciplinary team that will
demonstrate and bring to market the company's next generation of
commercial engines including the Geared TurbofanTM engine.

The Next Generation Product Family organization consolidates development
efforts across Pratt & Whitney divisions for large business jets,
regional jets and the next generation narrow-body aircraft.

He began his career with P&W in 1973, and has held increasingly
responsible positions with assignments in Propulsion Systems Analysis,
Program Management, and Marketing & Sales. Bob was in charge of the
Pratt & Whitney office in Toulouse, France, for three years
coordinating activities with Pratt & Whitney and Airbus.


1/La première réflexion est qu'ils (P & W) s'intéressent aux gros moteurs, pour les bicouloirs, alors qu'en début d'année ils affirmaient le contraire ... un élément nouveau peut être ??

2/Les progrès annuels espérés de 1-1,5 % sont trés intéressants .... surtout s'ils se superposent aux écos initiales annoncées à 12 % ... avec les corps de démo PW6000 ! Mais ce n'est pas trés clair !

3/ Le centrage vers les 30-35 000lbs implique aussi bien les 25 000 que les 40 000 ... donc l'intention pourrait bien être de parer pour les NG ainsi que pour les générations actuelles, je dis bien, l'intention ! Pour la réalité, on verra !

4/ Reste que le "Timing" vat être compliqué, car les partenaires pour cette catégorie, MTU en particulier, ne seront prêts que pour 2015, et sauf effort exceptionnel, pour gagner un ou 2 ans, la durée de vie du pogramme, sur un A320, serait plutôt vers les 5 ans que les 10 !

Il n'en reste pas moins que ...
- Le By pass de 12 est le sweet pot côté bruit ... après ou avant c'est plus bruyant ! Pas évident que RR ou GE montent au dessus de 10, j'ajoute pour les "Ducted fans" ... on verra !
- Les 15-16 % d'écos (Ou mieux ?) devraient être atteints en 2015-16 !
- Le GTF est plus léger que la techno 2 arbres (Moins d'étages de compresseurs !)
- Le réducteur, point le plus délicat, à l'air de bien marcher, il chauffe même moins que prévu !
Reste à savoir si ce sera une pièce d'usure... et son coût, par contre il devrait être facile à changer !

Et, grand avantage, il sera présent, le GTF, vers 2012-13 sur 2 séries d'avions ... alors que RR et GE n'en sont pas là !

J'attends personnellement qq mouvements pour Le Bourget !
Et Airbus sera probablement en pôle pour le GTF, le A320, se présentant quand même mieux que le 737, pour accueillir ce type de moteur ...

C'est ce que souhaitent, du moins, Bob Saïa et P&W!


Dernière édition par Beochien le Dim 24 Mai 2009 - 12:46, édité 1 fois

art_way
Whisky Charlie

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par art_way le Dim 24 Mai 2009 - 10:13

Content de vous revoir Beochien.. Wink


_________________
art_way

jullienaline
Whisky Charlie

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par jullienaline le Dim 24 Mai 2009 - 10:17

Bonjour à tous,
Bonjour Beochien,

J'allais le dire ! Very Happy
Sincèrement heureux de vous revoir parmi nous.

Amicalement

Jullienaline

Contenu sponsorisé

Re: Pratt & Whitney Les nouveaux GTF "Purepower"

Message par Contenu sponsorisé Aujourd'hui à 5:05


    La date/heure actuelle est Jeu 8 Déc 2016 - 5:05