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F35 JSF Actualité

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jullienaline
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par jullienaline le Lun 28 Déc 2009 - 22:15

Une nouvelle qui doit satisfaire nos amis britanniques. Le deuxième moteur du F-35, le F136 a vu son financement intégré dans la loi fiscale américaine 2010 : le congrès l'a approuvé et le President Obama a signé la loi.
Un an de gagné...

Rolls-Royce Comments Congressional Support for Continued JSF Engine Competition

Rolls-Royce welcomed continued Congressional support for competition as the US House and Senate approved funding for the F136 engine program, and President Barack Obama signed it into law.

The recently passed Appropriations Bill includes $465 Million in FY 2010 for the F136 engine, allowing competition to continue in the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) propulsion program. This marks the 15th consecutive year that Congress has supported competition in this key program.

This important vote re-affirms the benefits of competition, avoiding a $100 Billion, single-source engine monopoly without a competitive selection process.

“Funding the F136 represents a victory for competition that will benefit the military customer for decades to come,” said Dan Korte, Rolls-Royce President - Defence. “Prior engine competitions have demonstrated cost savings of 21 percent – which translates to projected savings of $20 billion or more over the lifetime of the JSF program.”

The F136 engine, being developed in a joint venture between Rolls-Royce and GE, supports approximately 2,500 jobs at the Rolls-Royce manufacturing facility in Indianapolis, at GE and throughout its US supply chain. With the current funding, the program will be approximately 85 percent complete, with the first production F136 engines scheduled to be delivered in 2012.

The GE Rolls-Royce F136 engine has remained within budget for many years. Furthermore, the F136 team’s solid history of executing its contract on schedule and within budget has led to consistent top program reviews from the Joint Program Office managing the F-35 program.

The F136 program has met all major milestones and the engine has performed as expected during testing, meeting targets for thrust and efficiency. The program has totaled more than 550 hours of testing since the System Development and Demonstration contract began in 2005.

In 2009, the GE Rolls-Royce Fighter Engine Team has already prompted positive changes through competition. In September, the Fighter Engine Team submitted an unsolicited fixed-price contract proposal -- a unique approach for early F136 production engines that would move significant cost risk from taxpayers to the companies. Fixed-price contracting is one of the key objectives of the Weapon Systems Acquisition Reform Act of 2009.

The first complete new-build F136 engine began testing earlier this year – a month ahead of schedule – under the System Development and Demonstration (SDD) contract with the US Government Joint Program Office for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program.

Continuing that success, the F136 program will ramp up to multiple test engines in 2010 and top well over 1,000 hours of testing by year end.

The F136 engine is the most advanced fighter aircraft engine ever developed and will be available to power all variants of the F-35 Lightning II aircraft for the U.S. military and eight partner nations. The F136 engine is a product of the best technology from two world-leading propulsion companies. The GE Rolls-Royce Fighter Engine Team has designed the only engine specifically developed for the F-35 aircraft, offering extra temperature margin and affordable growth.
http://www.defpro.com/news/details/12142/

Amicalement

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Mer 30 Déc 2009 - 20:57

Bonsoir à tous

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2009/12/29/336665/second-f-35b-arrives-at-usns-patuxent-river-base.html



Second F-35B arrives at USN's Patuxent River base
By Stephen Trimble

The US Navy now has two F-35Bs at Patuxent River, Maryland, to complete a series of tests leading to the first transition from horizontal flight to a vertical landing.

The flight test aircraft designated BF-2 landed at the USN's flight test centre at 14:26 today. US Marine Corps Maj Joseph T. "O.D." Bachmann flew the aircraft nonstop from Fort Worth, Texas, completing one aerial refuelling during the 3h19min flight.

BF-1 arrived at Patuxent River on 15 November, but remained parked until 23 December to complete a series of repairs.

The two aircraft are expected to complete up to 12 flight tests before reaching the vertical landing event, an early milestone in the programme's flight test schedule.

The vertical landing has slipped from its originally scheduled date last June. Lockheed Martin has said the event could still occur as soon as January. But the event could slide until the end of May, according to USMC officials.



Deux avions "BF" pour les essais de la variante à décollage vertical.
Dont la première transition sera réalisée à priori entre janvier et juin

Bonne soirée

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Jeu 7 Jan 2010 - 22:07

Bonsoir

Le grand ventilateur a été mis en fonction en vol...

L'embrayage a résisté semble t'i Wink

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/defense/index.jsp?plckController=Blog&plckBlogPage=BlogViewPost&newspaperUserId=27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7&plckPostId=Blog%3a27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7Post%3a40d235e5-8e6a-4c70-a7d0-c76f8286ab00&plckScript=blogScript&plckElementId=blogDest



STOVL F-35 Engages Lift Fan in Flight
Posted by Graham Warwick at 1/7/2010 2:23 PM CST
This just in - the first F-35B, aircraft BF-1, engaged its STOVL lift system in flight for the first time today (Jan. 7) during a test sortie from Pax River.

Lead STOVL pilot Graham Tomlinson engaged the shaft-driven lift fan at 5,000ft and 210kt, slowed to 180kt, then accelerated back to 210kt and converted back to conventional-flight mode.

The lift system was engaged for 14 minutes of the 48-min flight.

Plans call for the aircraft to fly progressively slower and lower on subsequent flights to build up confidence for the first vertical landing.


Bonne soirée

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Ven 8 Jan 2010 - 18:57

Bonsoir,

Ici

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/defense/index.jsp?plckController=Blog&plckBlogPage=BlogViewPost&newspaperUserId=27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7&plckPostId=Blog%3a27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7Post%3a0e4e8d11-9542-4d8a-9cee-27960b139057&plckScript=blogScript&plckElementId=blogDest

Quelques photos de la bestiole avec la tuyère orientée vers le bas et les trappes pour le ventilateur de flux froid ouvert...




Et hop !

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/press_releases/2010/100107ae_f35b_stovl-in-flight.html

Et la com officielle



Lockheed Martin F-35B Begins In-Flight STOVL Operations
NAVAL AIR STATION PATUXENT RIVER, Md., January 7th, 2010 -- The Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] F-35B Lightning II short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) stealth fighter engaged its STOVL propulsion system in flight for the first time today. The successful test is the first in a series of planned STOVL-mode flights that will include short takeoffs, hovers and vertical landings.

"The joint F-35 industry and government team has already shown during extended ground tests that the STOVL propulsion system performs well, and thousands of hours of component testing has validated its durability. Now we are seeing early proof that the system operates in flight as our team predicted," said Dan Crowley, Lockheed Martin executive vice president and F-35 program general manager.

The aircraft is powered by a single Pratt & Whitney F135 engine driving a Rolls-Royce LiftFan®. The system, which includes a Rolls-Royce 3-bearing swivel duct that vectors engine thrust and under-wing roll ducts that provide lateral stability, produces more than 41,000 pounds of vertical thrust. The F135 is the most powerful engine ever flown in a fighter aircraft.

F-35 Lead STOVL Pilot Graham Tomlinson of BAE Systems took off at 1:53 p.m. EST, climbed to 5,000 feet and engaged the shaft-driven LiftFan propulsion system at 210 knots (288 mph), then slowed to 180 knots (207 mph) with the system engaged before accelerating to 210 knots and converting back to conventional-flight mode. The STOVL propulsion system was engaged for a total of 14 minutes during the flight. Tomlinson landed at 2:41 p.m. EST.

STOVL-mode flights will continue, with the aircraft flying progressively slower, hovering, and ultimately landing vertically. Most STOVL-mode testing will be conducted at NAS Patuxent River.

The F-35B will replace U.S. Marine Corps AV-8B STOVL fighters, F/A-18 strike fighters and EA-6B electronic attack aircraft. The United Kingdom’s Royal Air Force and Royal Navy, as well as the Italian Air Force and Navy, also will employ the F-35B. With its short takeoff and vertical landing capabilities, the F-35B will enable allied forces to conduct operations from small ships and unprepared fields, enabling expeditionary operations around the globe.

The Lockheed Martin F-35 is a 5th generation fighter, uniquely characterized by advanced stealth with supersonic speed and high agility, sensor fusion, network-enabled capabilities and advanced sustainment. The three F-35 variants are derived from a common design, are being developed together and will use the same sustainment infrastructure worldwide, bringing economies of commonality and scale. The United States and eight international partners are planning to buy more than 3,000 F-35 aircraft.

Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 with its principal industrial partners, Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems. Two separate, interchangeable F-35 engines are under development: the Pratt & Whitney F135 and the GE Rolls-Royce Fighter Engine Team F136.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security company that employs about 140,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The corporation reported 2008 sales of $42.7 billion.




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Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Mer 13 Jan 2010 - 13:43

Bonjour à tous

Sur les ondes... le coûts d'utilisation du JSF plus importants que ceux des avions qu'il remplace

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-dewline/2010/01/chart-f-35bc-operating-costs-v.html

+40% à l'heure de vol...

Source Pentagone...

A suivre donc...

Bonne journée


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jullienaline
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par jullienaline le Lun 25 Jan 2010 - 23:53

Bonsoir à tous,

Une nouvelle qui ne m'étonne pas. Les USA refusent à Israel la possibilité de remplacer 50 % des systèmes du F-35 par des systèmes israéliens. Il aurait sans doute fallu donner accès à une partie du code source...

Israel's F-35 Demands Unacceptable to US

The US has expressed its inability to accept the demands made by the Israeli Defence Ministry to replace 50% of the systems in the F-35 fighter with Israeli-made technology.
The Israeli Air Force wants to acquire 25 F-35 stealth fighter jets, each costing nearly $130m, with the aim of boosting Israel's deterrence in the Middle East, according to jpost.com.
In a letter of request, submitted to the Pentagon in July 2009, the defence force demanded the right to install its own electronic warfare and radar systems on the fighter plane.
Israel has made this request in order to make the acquisition cost effective, as well as to give Israeli defence industries an opportunity to benefit from the JSF programme.
However, the US has rejected this demand, since it will prevent the installation of all of the systems the air force had requested.
The US wants to retain a qualitative edge over the F-35s that will be sold to its buyers.
Under the current JSF programme agreement, an F-35 buyer will have to send the jet to a maintenance centre, likely to be set up in Italy, on encountering any kind of mechanical malfunction.
The Lockheed-developed F-35 Lightning II, is a fifth-generation, single-seat, single-engine, stealth multirole fighter.
The F-35 will perform close air support, tactical bombing and air defence missions.
http://www.airforce-technology.com/news/news74994.html

Amicalement


_________________
Jullienaline

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Mar 26 Jan 2010 - 10:11

Bonjour,

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-dewline/2010/01/lockheed-road-to-f-35-sales-in.html

A ce qu'on peut lire ici, une vente à Israel pourrait par réaction en chaine déclencher les ventes dans la péninsule arabe...
Ben oui, si eux (Israel), ils ont de la 5ème génération... pourquoi pas nous Wink

Bonne lecture


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Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Jeu 28 Jan 2010 - 8:35

Bonjour à tous

Alors que certains prédisent que le JSF sera un grand succès commercial

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story_channel.jsp?channel=defense&id=news/awst/2010/01/25/AW_01_25_2010_p40-178862.xml&headline=F-35 To Dominate Future Fighter Market


Les essais se poursuivent

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/defense/index.jsp?plckController=Blog&plckBlogPage=BlogViewPost&newspaperUserId=27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7&plckPostId=Blog%3a27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7Post%3ac015bf81-4ac4-4ba8-96cd-8eae5082a9f0&plckScript=blogScript&plckElementId=blogDest



STOVL F-35B Flies Slower ... and Slower
Posted by Graham Warwick at 1/27/2010 4:32 PM CST
Lead F-35B test pilot Graham Tomlinson flew aircraft BF-1 down to 120kt in STOVL mode today, Jan. 27. on the fourth flight from Pax River in which the propulsive-lift system has been engaged.
BF-1 was slowed to 180kt with the lift-fan engaged on the first STOVL-mode flight on Jan. 7, then to 150kt on the second and third flights - flown first by BAE Systems' Tomlinson then by Lockheed's David Nelson. Today's 48-min flight was BF-1's 32nd and its fifth since arriving at Pax on Nov. 15.

RAF's Long flies BF-2 (Photo: Lockheed Martin)
BF-2, meanwhile, has logged 19 flights, three of them since arriving at Pax on Dec. 29. The aircraft flew twice on Jan. 26, once for 1.3h piloted by RAF active-duty pilot Sgn Ldr Steve Long, and again for 0.9h on an aerial refuelling sortie piloted by Lockheed's Jeff Knowles.
Lockheed has said BF-1 needs a dozen STOVL flights before the first vertical landing, so I guess it looks like February. I hate it when Bill's right...


Vol à basse vitesse 120 kt avec le lift fan engagé..
Il reste une douzaine de vols à effectués avant le premier atterissage vertical.

Bonne journée


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jullienaline
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par jullienaline le Mer 10 Fév 2010 - 17:45

Bonjour à tous,

Le premier pilote britannique, le Squadron Leader Steve Long de la RAF, a volé sur le F-35 au-dessus de Patuxent River.

http://www.defpro.com/news/details/13049/

Amicalement


_________________
Jullienaline

jullienaline
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par jullienaline le Ven 12 Fév 2010 - 19:05

Bonsoir à tous,

Deux vidéos du F-35B SVTOL :





Impressionnant, j'ai hate de le voir.

Amicalement


_________________
Jullienaline

jullienaline
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par jullienaline le Jeu 18 Fév 2010 - 13:56

Bonjour à tous,

C'est officiel : un an de plus pour le JSF.

Pentagon Official Confirms 1-Year Delay For JSF

Pentagon officials on Feb. 16 confirmed Deputy Defense Secretary Bill Lynn's announcement one day prior that the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) program will be delayed by about one year.
The Pentagon's No. 2 official said this week that the jet's development schedule would slip between 12 months and 13 months despite an aggressive restructuring of the program that was announced earlier this month.
"The development was originally projected to last an additional 30 months; we think with the additional test aircraft it will be closer to a delay of about 12 or 13 months, but I can't give you the cost numbers," The Australian newspaper quoted Lynn as saying during a speech at a shipyard in South Australia. He did not say if this would affect the delivery timeline for the JSF.
The delay is due to the integration of additional test aircraft that were mandated under the restructuring, which also extended system development and design (SDD) until 2015, according to a Pentagon official.
"That is a true statement, the driver on this is the test aircraft," the official said Feb. 16. "The driver on this whole thing, about a year, is due to the additional test aircraft."
Like Lynn, the official would not comment on how this will affect the delivery schedule for the plane. The U.S. Marine Corps is set to get its first F-35s in 2012, with the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Navy scheduled to receive their jets in 2013 and 2014, respectively.
On Feb. 1, Steve O'Bryan, Lockheed's vice president for F-35 business development, told reporters that while the jet's flight tests are roughly six months behind schedule, the company will deliver the plane in time to meet the Marines' initial operating capability date of 2012.
"I think you'll see that we're going to deliver all the SDD jets by the end of this year and get them in flight test," O'Bryan said.
Under the Pentagon's restructuring that was announced Feb. 1, Defense Secretary Robert Gates ordered an additional test jet and $2.8 billion be put into the extended F-35 SDD, withheld more than $600 million in performance fees from Lockheed, cut planes from F-35 acquisition coffers and fired Marine Corps Maj. Gen. David Heinz, the Pentagon's F-35 program manager.
The Defense Department is requesting $10.7 billion in its 2011 budget to continue development on the F-35 and purchase 43 of the planes.
http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=4500895&c=AIR&s=TOP

Amicalement


_________________
Jullienaline

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Ven 26 Fév 2010 - 8:43

Bonjour à tous

Premier atterissage court pour le JSF

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-dewline/2010/02/f-35b-performs-first-short-lan.html



En attendant l'atterissage vertical

Bonne journée


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Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Mar 2 Mar 2010 - 15:35

Bonjour à tous

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-dewline/2010/03/data-deluge-day-for-f-35.html

Un petit lien qui vaut le détour
Pas de mal de données semble avoir été rendue publique sur le programme dont l'avenir reste incertain ?
A suivre dans les prochains jours
Bonne lecture


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Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Jeu 11 Mar 2010 - 22:50

Bonsoir,

Une petite video pour la nuit



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Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Ven 12 Mar 2010 - 23:08

Bonsoir à tous

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story_generic.jsp?channel=aerospacedaily&id=news/asd/2010/03/12/01.xml&headline=Carter Confirms JSF Unit Price Nearly Doubled



The average per unit cost of the Lockheed Martin Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) has substantially increased, from $50 million to up to $95 million, Pentagon acquisition chief Ashton Carter told senators March 11 on Capitol Hill.
In today’s dollars, the per unit cost is estimated to be $112 million per unit.
The first development estimate was made in 2001 in Fiscal 2002 dollars when Lockheed received its contract for development, which is now estimated at $50 billion. Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.), chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, asked whether Lockheed Martin knowingly “bought into” the program by proposing an unrealistically low price during the competition with Boeing and later recouping the money through repeated cost overruns. This is a “pattern that would match that,” Carter said during the hearing in reply.
The average per unit cost incorporates the entire price of the program, including development, procurement and fielding.This massive overrun means the U.S. Air Force will notify Congress “within days” of the program’s “critical” breach of cost overrun limits included in the Nunn-McCurdy statute (Aerospace DAILY, March 3). This will trigger a mandatory review of alternatives for the program.
The figures presume a purchase of 2,443 aircraft by the U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps.
Also, as a result of the 13-month development delay, the Air Force has again reassessed its initial operational capability (IOC) date for the F-35, which is now expected in 2016. Only last week officials said it would be 2015. However, Carter’s March 3 JSF acquisition decision memorandum updates the closure of operational testing to be in April 2016, prompting the Air Force’s new date. The Navy also plans to declare IOC in 2016. The Marine Corps still says it will reach IOC in 2012 with JSF.
Factors contributing to the cost increase include a weight-reduction initiative in 2006 for the short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing version for the Marine Corps, delayed development schedule, increased labor and overhead rates, degradation of airframe commonality, reduced production quantities, increases in commodity prices (particularly titanium) and major subcontractor cost growth, Carter says.
It appears, however, that the Pentagon is eager to move forward with the program. Air Force Secretary Michael Donley said last week that no viable alternatives exist for the single-engine, stealthy F-35.
Carter told senators that he had been proceeding with management of JSF since November as if it had already been in a Nunn-McCurdy breach. Measures taken to shore up the program include an extra $2.8 billion added to development, substantially lower production ramp up (which takes place in parallel with flight testing) and the addition of more flight test assets and software testing facilities. The senior program officer, Marine Corps Maj. Gen. David Heinz, also was dismissed, and his position was elevated to a three-star level


Gros surcoût sur le JSF.
Le pentagone pourrait penser que ces surcoûts pourrait résulter d'une offre anormalement basse de L Martin qui se refait ensuite sur ces dépassements.
Le programme entre dans une phase d'audit importante.

Capacité opérationnelles initiales pour l'USAF et la navy en 2016

A suivre

Bonne soirée


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jullienaline
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par jullienaline le Jeu 18 Mar 2010 - 22:53

Bonsoir à tous,

Premier atterrissage vertical !

Lockheed Martin F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Succeeds In First Vertical Landing

NAVAL AIR STATION PATUXENT RIVER, Md., March 18th, 2010 -- A supersonic Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] F-35B Lightning II stealth fighter rode more than 41,000 pounds of thrust to a vertical landing today for the first time, confirming its required ability to land in confined areas both ashore and afloat.

“Today’s vertical landing onto a 95-foot square pad showed that we have the thrust and the control to maneuver accurately both in free air and in the descent through ground effect,” said F-35 Lead STOVL Pilot Graham Tomlinson.

Tomlinson performed an 80-knot (93 miles per hour) short takeoff from Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., at 1:09 p.m. EDT. About 13 minutes into the flight, he positioned the aircraft 150 feet above the airfield, where he commanded the F-35 to hover for approximately one minute then descend to the runway.

“The low workload in the cockpit contrasted sharply with legacy short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) platforms,” said Tomlinson, a retired Royal Air Force fighter pilot and a BAE Systems employee since 1986. “Together with the work already completed for slow-speed handling and landings, this provides a robust platform to expand the fleet’s STOVL capabilities.”

Robert J. Stevens, Lockheed Martin chairman and chief executive officer, said, “Today’s vertical landing of the F-35 BF-1 aircraft was a vivid demonstration of innovative technology that will serve the global security needs of the U.S. and its allies for decades to come. I am extremely proud of the F-35 team for their dedication, service and performance in achieving this major milestone for the program.”

Doug Pearson, Lockheed Martin vice president of F-35 Test and Verification, said, “The successful first vertical landing today met our test objectives and demonstrates the F-35B’s capacity to operate from a very small area at sea or on shore – a unique capability for a supersonic, stealth fighter. This is the first of many such tests to fully define the short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) characteristics of the world’s most capable 5th generation fighter. We will routinely conduct vertical landings and short takeoffs to further expand the operational flight envelope for the F-35B.”

The aircraft in today’s test, known as BF-1, is one of three F-35B STOVL jets currently undergoing flight trials at the Patuxent River test site. It is powered by a single Pratt & Whitney F135 turbofan engine driving a counter-rotating Rolls-Royce LiftFan®. The shaft-driven LiftFan system, which includes a Rolls-Royce three-bearing swivel duct that vectors engine thrust and under-wing roll ducts that provide lateral stability, produces more than 41,000 pounds of vertical lift. The F135 is the most powerful engine ever flown in a fighter aircraft.
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/press_releases/2010/100318ae_f35b-vertical-landing.html

Amicalement


_________________
Jullienaline

jullienaline
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par jullienaline le Jeu 18 Mar 2010 - 23:02

La vidéo :



Amicalement


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Jullienaline

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Dim 21 Mar 2010 - 22:09

Bonjour à tous

Maintenant qu'il vole dans tous les sens, certains vont avoir le temps de réapprendre quelques notions de compta

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2010/03/19/339714/f-35-cost-estimate-grows-up-to-nearly-90.html


The US Department of Defense today confirmed the cost estimate for F-35 Joint Strike Fighter procurement has leaped between 57% and 89% since contract award eight years ago.

The new estimate raises the average cost of the latest Lockheed Martin stealth fighter from $59 million to between $93 million and $112 million, the DOD says. If adjusted for inflation over the programme's 30-year production plan, the average cost per aircraft grows to $114 million to $135 million.

The average cost is based on the DOD's plan to buy 2,443 operational F-35s through 2035.

The data confirms prior statements indicating the F-35 could breach a cost ceiling mandated under the Nunn-McCurdy Law, which triggers an automatic review of the programme.

DOD officials unveiled a sweeping restructuring of the programme on 1 February. The key changes, which included replacing the government programme manager, adding four flight test aircraft and slashing the five-year production plan by 120 aircraft, anticipated the restructuring required under the Nunn-McCurdy Law.


Ca met la bête au même niveau de prix qu'un F22 (en tout cas les derniers commandés)...

Dans ce contexte... il va être compliqué d'expliquer qu'il va falloir dépenser plus pour un second moteur... même si c'est pour baisser les coûts de fonctionnement.

Bonne soirée


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Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Lun 22 Mar 2010 - 22:29

Bonsoir à tous
Un autre article sur le JSF ici

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story.jsp?id=news/awst/2010/03/22/AW_03_22_2010_p33-213688.xml&headline=F-35B Achieves Vertical Landing Milestone&channel=defense


The F-35B is taking a major step forward with verticallanding test milestones, though the massive price increase for the stealthy, single-engine fighter is raising eyebrows among international customers.

The first vertical landing took place Mar. 18 after a 1:09 p.m. EDT takeoff at NAS Patuxent River, Md. BF-1, the first short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing (Stovl) model, rode more than 41,000 lb. of thrust to achieve this milestone, which is key in proving the aircraft’s suitability for the Marine Corps, U.K. and Italian forces.

The landing occurred after an 80-kt. short takeoff that required less than 1,000 ft. After 13 min. of flight, Graham Tomlinson, F-35 lead (Stovl) test pilot for Lockheed Martin, positioned the aircraft at 150 ft. above the landing site, hovered for about 1 min. and commenced the descent to the runway. He says he is “speechless” at the ease of the landing. He “didn’t see any ground effect, which—to me—is a miracle.”

Marine Corps Lt. Gen. George Trautman, deputy commandant for aviation, is confident the aircraft will be ready for an initial operational capability (IOC) in December with Block 2B software, which will allow the use of two AIM-120D air-to-air interceptors and two 1,000-lb. Joint Direct Attack Munitions or two 500-lb. laser-guided bombs—all carried internally. With this software, the aircraft will be able to fly at 7g with a 50‑deg. angle of attack. The first unit, however, is not slated to deploy until 2014.

The Air Force and Navy have slipped IOC until 2016. Marine Corps IOC will include 15 aircraft for training at Eglin AFB, Fla., four in an operational test and evaluation detachment and the first operational squadron of 10 in Yuma, Ariz.

Critics say this plan is too aggressive. “Some people are missing the point,” Trautman says. He points out that the aircraft will exceed the range of current strike fighters, incorporate low-observability into the Marine Corps fleet for the first time, and offer better communications and sensors.

The test comes only weeks after Defense Secretary Robert Gates slapped the company with a $614-million award-fee withhold. The development program has been delayed by 13 months, and 122 aircraft were clipped from the near-term production profile to pay for a cost overrun.

This vertical-landing test had been slated for last summer. Though a significant step forward, it is not likely to overshadow doubts of prospective international buyers in light of the more than 50% increase in per-unit F-35 cost.

Per-unit price has spiked from $50 million in Fiscal 2002 dollars to as much as $95 million. Today’s flyaway cost is about $112 million.

Israel, while not a partner in the development program, is expected to be one of the largest export customers and would likely have been the first non-partner to buy. However, there is now growing interest among senior Israeli defense officials in purchasing a different fighter prior to F-35.

Israel was targeting procurement of a first squadron of 25 F-35As in 2015-16. This would have called for a signed contract in 2010, with initial payments beginning in 2011. Overall, $2.7 billion was budgeted.

But the negotiations have met several obstacles. While the U.S. sanctioned installation of Israeli communications systems and munitions, access to the JSF’s electronic warfare suite and source code needed for modifications is not approved. Israel wants to install unique, indigenously designed systems as it has done on other aircraft and it rejects a U.S. demand that JSF maintenance be performed in a regional center.

The Israeli requirements have driven the price of the contract to $3.25 billion ($130 million per aircraft), far above the available budget.

The Israeli air force (IAF) needs new fighters in this decade, as many of its aircraft are nearly 40 years old, a senior defense source tells Aviation Week. They should look at alternatives, he says “This could also improve its position in JSF negotiations.”

But the IAF, by contrast, is clinging to its F-35 ambitions: “Although there are still issues to be resolved, mostly about the price, we believe the contract could be concluded soon.”

Most Israeli defense officials agree that the best existing alternative to the JSF would be Boeing’s new F-15 Silent Eagle, which combines traditional F-15 capabilities with a reduced radar cross section and internal weapons bay. However, no formal proposal has been made.

“From the little we know, the . . . F-15SE could reach $100 million per aircraft, not so different from the F-35,” says the IAF source. “Naturally, we will consider it if there will be a major delay in the F-35, but haven’t arrived at that point yet.”

Meanwhile, JSF also appears to meeting big headwind in Denmark, where it is competing against the Saab Gripen and Boeing F/A-18E/F, which is seen as the frontrunner.


En complément des infos déjà rappelées dans les messages précédents, un point intéressant sur le perspectives de commande :
1) Israel : le retard et le coût du JSF posent problème, mais une alternative crédible sous forme du F15 silentEagle n'est pas si bon marché que ça (aux environ de 100 millions contre 130 pour le JSF avec les spécificités d'avionique et de guerre électronique Israelienne

2) Danemark : le JSF est confronté au Grippen et au Superhornet

Bonne soirée


_________________
@avia.poncho

jullienaline
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par jullienaline le Dim 28 Mar 2010 - 16:57

Bonjour à tous,

135 millions de $ serait le prix unitaire actuel estimé du JSF. Ceci pour une série de 2440 appareils.
Il n'est pas encore en or massif, mais il s'en rapproche !

JSF Price Jumps to $135 Million

At the end of what has been a truly positive week for Lockheed Martin’s Joint Strike Fighter, witnessing a number of key milestones in the aircraft’s test phase, DoD just had to damper the celebration somewhat by releasing updated cost estimates that show the per aircraft price tag has jumped nearly 90 percent since 2001, from $69 million to $135 million.
The current estimate for what the military must pay to buy 2,443 JSF aircraft has increased to $329 billion, from an original estimate of $197 billion for more than 2,800 aircraft (all figures in then year dollars), according to a Pentagon report provided to DOD Buzz.
The jump in the per unit price triggers a Nunn-McCurdy “critical breach,” requiring a “recertification” from Defense Secretary Robert Gates that the fighter is vital to national security. Since Gates has gone way out on a limb in favor of the JSF, that outcome is pretty much guaranteed. The cost estimates come from DOD’s Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation (CAPE) office.
The Nunn-McCurdy breach is calculated using constant or base year dollars, which show an increase in JSF unit cost from $50 million in 2001 to $95 million today. Using then year, or inflation adjusted, dollars is a more accurate indication of what the military will actually pay for a weapon.
This week saw the F-35B STOVL version of the JSF complete a first ever hover and first ever vertical landing.
http://www.dodbuzz.com/2010/03/19/jsf-price-tag-jumps-to-135-million/

Amicalement


_________________
Jullienaline

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Lun 29 Mar 2010 - 22:53

Bonsoir...

Cher et compliqué...

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/defense/index.jsp?plckController=Blog&plckBlogPage=BlogViewPost&newspaperUserId=27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7&plckPostId=Blog%3a27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7Post%3afe1891f8-92d3-4f98-99ab-77516d2aeafb&plckScript=blogScript&plckElementId=blogDest



Is complexity to blame for the F-35's development delays and cost increases? Or, more precisely, is an aerospace-industry design process that has failed to adapt to the increasing complexity of weapon systems to blame?

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency thinks so, and has produced an interesting chart to illustrate its point. The chart plots product complexity against development time for three industries: integrated circuits, automobiles and aerospace vehicles.



All charts: DARPA

Integrated-circuit makers have held development times steady even as chips have soared in complexity. Car manufacturers have actually reduced their development timespans. Only the aerospace industry, according to the chart, has seen development time (and cost) increase in lockstep with product complexity.

DARPA defines complexity as parts count plus lines of software code, which it admits is an imperfect metric. But if you look at the F-35, it works. Once seen as the low end of a hi-lo fighter mix with the F-22, the F-35 is actually a far more complex vehicle: three versions and 6 million lines of avionics software (19 million in the complete system) compared with one model and 1.7 million lines for the F-22.

DARPA blames the systems engineering process the aerospace industry has used for the past 40 years, as enshrined in Mil-Std-499A (pdf). This basically takes the top-level system layout and decomposes it into first subsystem then component designs, then integrates them via first component then subsystem testing and finally verification and validation of the complete system.



The research agency sees a lot of problems with the process, arguing that because detailed design is done within functional stovepipes that are "based on arbitrary cleavage lines" - like between power and thermal management - when components and subsystems come together during integration there are "unmodeled and undesired interactions" that force redesigns, driving up delays and costs.

DARPA is launching a new program, META, in a bid to develop a new system engineering process - modelled on that used by the computer industry - with the goal of compressing the development time for a complex air or ground vehicle by a factor of five. Going back to the chart, that means cutting the development time for a next-generation platform from approaching 20 years to around 5.

A key part of META is using complexity as the metric, rather than the traditional SWaP - size, weight and power. Apply that to the F-35 and you can begin to see why development is proving so difficult. A complexity metric would, DARPA says, allow "cyber-vs-physical" trades - between implementing a function in software or hardware - and trade-offs between complexity, performance, cost, etc.

DARPA believes the new metric would drive designers to reduce complexity for a given capability, and so reduce development time and cost. The agency admits a META-designed aircraft "is likely to be less weight-optimized", noting that chips and cars sacrifice optimality for lower development costs or faster time to market.


Too complex? (Photo: Lockheed Martin)

The META program is planned to culminate in a demonstration in which a complex air or ground vehicle (still to be identified) will be designed, manufactured, integrated and tested five times faster than with a conventional engineering approach.

The program is planned to begin this summer with the award of three nine-month, $4 million Phase 1a contracts to develop the complexity metric and the new design and verification flows. Two six-month, $10 million Phase 1b contracts to implement the new design tools would follow.

One contractor would be selected for Phase 2, lasting a year and worth $26 million, to develop a library of component models for use in the new design flow. These models - for avionics, control, data, thermal systems, structures, etc - would include all power, data and structural interfaces as well as spurious interactions such a vibration and EMI.


Notional META design flow

The final step - budget and duration TBD - would be to demonstrate a five-fold schedule compression by building and testing a "correct-by-design" vehicle having minimal discrepancies or unanticipated interactions, and reliability metrics for the complete system that are within 10% of model-based predictions.

Changing the way the industry designs weapon systems sounds truly "DARPA-hard", but the lesson of the F-35 program appears to be that aircraft have become too complicated. We either get off that line on the graph or we learn to live with the delays and costs.

Trop compliqué le F35
Trop compliqué le protocole MIL-ST499A...
Heureusement la DARPA a la solution -> programme META
Qui conduira comme pour les bagnoles à des produits uniquement optimisés selon l'axe "temps de développement" et donc à des avions plutôt lourd (le F35 est-il réputé léger ?)

Enfin, si j'ai bien compris...

Bonne soirée


_________________
@avia.poncho

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Jeu 29 Avr 2010 - 9:27

Bonjour à tous

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story.jsp?id=news/asd/2010/04/28/01.xml&headline=GE/Rolls Bid To Save F136 With Fixed-Price&channel=defense

GE et RR tentent de faire vivre le F136 en proposant une offre commerciale aggressive.


General Electric and Rolls-Royce have extended their fixed-price offer on early F136s in a bid to offset projected cost figures used by the Pentagon to justify cancellation of the second engine for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

On top of last September’s offer of a fixed price for 2011 procurement, the new offer on engine purchases in Fiscal 2012, 2013 and 2014 would save the Defense Department about $1 billion before head-to-head competition for full-rate production is planned to begin in 2015, GE/Rolls Fighter Engine Team chairman Jean Lydon-Rogers claims.

Half of the claimed savings would come from cost reductions on the F136, with the other half expected to come from Pratt & Whitney matching GE/Rolls by offering competitive fixed prices for its F135 engine. “The competitive behavior is already in force,” she says, pointing out that Pratt responded to the team’s previous proposal by offering a lower price for 2011 procurement of F135s.

The new proposal offers a specific price for engines purchased in 2012 and a lower price in 2013 and again in 2014. The offer covers some 150 low-rate initial production F136s that the Pentagon would buy under the current program of record.

The $1 billion in savings would help offset the $2.9 billion cost to complete development and begin production of the F136 projected by the Pentagon’s Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation (CAPE) group and used to justify again zeroing funding for the F136 in its Fiscal 2011 budget request.

GE/Rolls does not agree with the CAPE analysis, estimating it will take $1.8 billion to complete F136 development and tool up for production, Lydon-Rogers says. But it hopes the projected savings from competitive fixed pricing on low-rate initial production will help sell the second engine to Congress, which has previously always voted to restore funding for the F136.

“This offer will take $1 billion out of the first five years and turn the business case [for the second engine] from neutral to very positive,” says David Joyce, president of GE Aviation. “This is a way through the short-term cost pressures to get to the long term benefit [of competitive procurement].” The Government Accountability Office has projected savings from competitive engine procurement at close to 20%, or $20 billion, over the program’s life, he says.



_________________
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jullienaline
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par jullienaline le Jeu 13 Mai 2010 - 16:21

Bonjour à tous,

Le prix du F-35 est un sujet sensible. Bill Sweetman vient d'en faire l'expérience. En écrivant sur sa page Facebook cette boutade concernant sa prochaine visite de l'usine Lockheed de Fort-Worth :

“Gentlemen, your target for tonight is Fort Worth. Flacks are predicted to be numerous and persistent on the run-in and over the target, and bullshit is expected to be dense throughout the mission. Synchronize watches and good luck.”

il ne se doutait sans doute pas de la réaction de son journal Aviation Week. Le journal lui a tout simplement retiré temporairement (combien de temps ?) la couverture du F-35...

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/05/aviation-week-grounds-top-critic-of-lockheed-jet/

Amicalement


_________________
Jullienaline

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Lun 31 Mai 2010 - 10:25

Bonjour à tous

Quelques nouvelles du F136

http://aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story.jsp?id=news/awx/2010/05/28/awx_05_28_2010_p0-230831.xml&headline=JSF F136 Engine Could Survive Another Year&channel=defense




The General Electric/Rolls-Royce F136 engine for the Lockheed Martin F-35 Joint Strike Fighter appears increasingly likely to survive at least one more year after a slew of Capitol Hill developments created a scenario where the Obama administration’s veto threat may fall victim to other priorities.
Democratic-led votes by the House and a key Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC) on May 27 pushing repeal of the so-called “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy in the military over homosexuality suddenly lined up that administration priority against any veto threats previously levied over defense acquisitions.
The votes come as lawmakers prepare Fiscal 2011 defense authorization legislation, a highly popular policy bill made even more politically important this summer as Congress faces November elections that are expected to challenge Democratic control of one, if not both, chambers.
Meanwhile, the whole House is now on record, literally, in defense of its Armed Services Committee’s $485-million authorization of the F136. The House voted 231-193 against an amendment to the defense bill there that would have diverted F136 funds elsewhere, thus establishing a majority already willing to vote against a possible veto.
At the same time, the corresponding Senate committee’s chairman let it be known that he again supports having dueling engines and was “very encouraged” by the House. Senate Armed Services Chairman Carl Levin (D-Mich.) told reporters on May 28 that while his panel took no action on F136 in its May 26-27 markup of the defense bill, he expects it to be a major issue by the time authorizers hash out a compromise of the two chambers’ bills, and that he would like the F136 to continue. “It makes sense to have that competition,” he said.
Asked about the White House and Pentagon veto recommendation over the F136, Levin instead played up the comprehensive and otherwise popular provisions of the annual defense measure, like a 1.4% across-the-board pay raise for all members of the uniformed services. “It’s difficult for me to believe the president won’t look at the entire bill, rather than just one provision,” said Levin, who has been an SASC leader for years.
Besides the second engine, Levin said he aims to fence JSF funding as the House did. As with the F136, the SASC took no action in its markup on fencing funds, but Levin indicated he expects Senate floor or congressional conference efforts to that effect.
Elsewhere in JSF developments, the third and so far final version—the U.S. Navy’s F-35C carrier variant—should fly by early next week at Lockheed Martin’s Fort Worth plant.
The first mission-systems test F-35, aircraft BF-4, has returned to flight, and the 737-based Cooperative Avionics Test Bed has begun flying with the latest Block 1 mission-system software and all sensors except the electro-optical distributed aperture system, which will be added later this year. Block 1 is to begin flying in the F-35 before year-end.


A priori si je comprends bien : statut quo et donc le F136 vit encore

Bonne lecture


_________________
@avia.poncho

Beochien
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Beochien le Jeu 3 Juin 2010 - 15:12

Bonjour ...

C'est tout le programe F 35 qui grince un peu !
382 Billions de $, c'est le côut estimé du programme USA pour 35 ans d'exploitation, le double du coût prévu, et l'avion est encore hors specs et en retard ... et qq clients et partenaires export qui commencent à traîner les pieds .... comme la Hollande !
Une similitude avec le programme A400M, ??Ce n'est pas la même échelle en tout cas !

Et GE/RR qui veulent leur part avec le F 136 au milieu de ce mess ... ben va falloir vraiment prouver qu'ils peuvent faire baisser les coûts, et non se joindre au bal des Chacals pour avoir leur part du gâteau ....
A suivre !

Un appel d'offre type "Tankers" un jour, et avec des garanties semblables pour les "US fighters" ??
Peu probable ... trop de risque de faillite pour un acteur "majeur" Ouaf !

---------------- Le lien Flightglobal ---------------------

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2010/06/03/342712/us-department-of-defense-raises-f-35-cost-estimate-to-382-billion.html

US Department of Defense raises F-35 cost estimate to $382 billion

FPRS

Beochien
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Beochien le Ven 4 Juin 2010 - 14:48

Bonjour

Les bienfaits de la compétition .... la guerre aux exclusivités .... ben quand c'est GE qui la pratique, dans une de demande d'ouverture à la compétition, .... aprés un petit paquet d'aides pour développer le 2nde motorisation du F35 ... et un budget déjà doublé pour l'avion !

Ca finit par prendre une certaine saveur !

RR* partner, avec GE ... mais pas trop acteur dans la soupe du congrés US !
(*C'est pour Sévrien, pas la peine qu'il s'énerve, ça peut nuire à sa santé)

----------------- Extrait de AviationWek (3) pages ! ---------------

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story.jsp?id=news/awst/2010/05/31/AW_05_31_2010_p28-230206.xml&headline=Lockheed%20Wary%20Of%20F-35%20Engine%20Battle%20Impact&channel=defense

At stake is the future of the General Electric/Rolls-Royce Fighter Engine Team’s F136 alternate powerplant. The Pentagon has again tried to cancel the engine, citing cost, but in its mark-up of the 2011 budget, the key House Armed Services Committee (HASC) added $485 million for development.

GE Aviation President/CEO David Joyce says competition is the only way to rein in “spiraling out-of-control costs,” citing a $2.5-billion increase in F135 development expenses. At the same time, GE and Rolls dispute the Pentagon’s $2.9-billion estimate of what it will take to complete development of the F136 and begin competitive procurement.

With $3 billion already spent on F136 development, the Pentagon’s assessment of the business case for competitive procurement has gone from negative to breakeven, but the department still argues the “extra engine” is an unaffordable luxury in today’s budget environment.

“We understand Defense Secretary Robert Gates has a number of difficult calls to make, but we disagree with him on this issue,” says Jim Guyette, president/CEO of Rolls-Royce North America. “The right answer is to invest the last 25% to complete development of F136.”

While acknowledging the JSF program was set up originally to have competitive engine procurement, publicly Lockheed Martin is staying agnostic on the issue. But a senior program official says the company’s leadership has been meeting with GE and Pratt in a bid to prevent a showdown that could damage the F-35 program.

The concern is that money for the second engine will ultimately come from somewhere in the program and further push down the ramp rate as Lockheed struggles to reach the production throughput required. In its budget mark-up, the HASC tied release of funds for the F-35 program to the Pentagon fully funding competitive engine procurement. Gates has warned the conditions could make the program “unexecutable.”

JPRS

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Ven 4 Juin 2010 - 23:22

Bonsoir,

De mémoire RR est sur le boîtier de transfert et l'embrayage du F135 de la version STOL

Wink

Bonne soirée


_________________
@avia.poncho

Paul
Whisky Quebec

Re: F35 JSF Actualité

Message par Paul le Sam 5 Juin 2010 - 1:02


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Re: F35 JSF Actualité

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