ACTUALITE Aéronautique

ACTUALITE Aéronautique : Suivi et commentaire de l'actualité aéronautique

    BioCarburant

    Partagez

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Sam 10 Oct 2009 - 11:37

    Bonsoir à tous,

    Boeing étudie la possibilité d'obtenir des carburants verts à partir de plantes terrestres vivant dans l'eau de mer (marais, mangroves).

    Seawater plants yield green aviation fuel in new research

    WASHINGTON, Oct. 6 (UPI) -- Boeing and international academic and business partners are looking into ways of producing commercially viable aviation fuel from saltwater plants in a push toward reducing carbon emissions from travel.

    The Boeing Co. said scientific studies were focused on salicornia bigelovii and saltwater mangroves -- plants known as halophytes.

    Research conducted in the United States, Abu Dhabi, the United Arab Emirates and other locations showed the plants thrive when irrigated with seawater and can be produced in large quantities to extract biofuel suitable for aircraft.

    Aviation industry analysts said a biofuel substitute for hydrocarbons used in air travel could help ease environmentalist concerns over aviation's carbon footprint.

    A switch from expensive, high-octane aviation fuel to biofuels could also help counter a rising global aversion to air travel because of the perceived damage to the Earth's ecology, said the analysts.

    Boeing said it is joining with UOP LLC, a Honeywell company based in Des Plaines, Ill., to commission a study on the sustainability of a leading family of saltwater-based plant candidates for renewable jet fuel.

    The study is being commissioned as part of the Sustainable Aviation Fuel Users Group consortium, which brings together UOP and airlines.

    Boeing said the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology in Abu Dhabi will lead the study, which will examine the overall potential for sustainable, large-scale production of biofuels made from the halophytes. The institute was established with the cooperation of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    Yale University's School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and UOP will participate in the analysis, which will include an assessment of the total carbon lifecycle of biofuels.

    Scientists say halophytes can be highly productive sources of biomass energy, thrive in arid land and can be irrigated with seawater, making them suitable for biofuel development.

    Abu Dhabi, like parts of the United States and Central and South America, is seen by experts as a viable location for conducting a lifecycle-analysis study.

    With improved plant science and agronomy, early testing results indicate that halophytes have the potential to deliver very high yields per unit of land, Boeing said.

    Previous biofuel research has focused on algae and vegetation but has met with skepticism, both because of large quantities of fresh water involved in some of the fuel production and because of doubts about how long the alternatives can last as viable substitutes for oil.

    Billy Glover, managing director of environmental strategy for Boeing Commercial Airplanes, said the study will enable researchers to "better know if certain types of halophytes meet the carbon reduction and socioeconomic criteria that will allow them to become part of a portfolio of sustainable biofuel solutions for aviation."

    Abu Dhabi, a major oil producer within the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, has been investing in research that can prepare the country for a future when oil -- and oil revenues -- are no longer plentiful.

    Dr. Sgouris Sgouridis of the Masdar Institute said the initiative aims to create and sustain the world's first carbon-neutral, zero-waste city, Masdar City, to be located on the outskirts of Abu Dhabi.

    Boeing says biofuel development is focused on plant sources that do not distort the global food chain, compete with freshwater resources or lead to unintended land use change.

    Biofuel research has also picked up in the Caribbean -- though on a modest level and for a different reason. Most Caribbean countries have been hit hard by the recession and are finding it difficult to buy oil, even when offered on easy terms by neighboring exporters such as Venezuela. With international help, Caribbean states have been pushing initiatives to produce biofuels to keep their economies going.
    http://www.upi.com/Science_News/Resource-Wars/2009/10/06/Seawater-plants-yield-green-aviation-fuel-in-new-research/UPI-84051254864364/

    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Dim 11 Oct 2009 - 23:46

    La Navy et L'US Air Force s'y mettent aussi. Ils sont en contrat avec des agriculteurs du Montana qui ont planté 8000 hectares cette année de cameline ou lin batard. Avec cette production, une deuxième série de tests aura lieu au mois de juin prochain.

    US Navy and Air Force Test Homegrown Jetfuel With 80% Less CO2

    The US Air Force has placed an order for 100,000 gallons of Camelina-based jet fuel, in addition to the 40,000 gallons the Navy ordered last month for $2.7 million, with delivery to begin this year. Sustainable Oils is supplying them with a biofuel grown in Montana with 80% lower carbon emissions than jet fuels now.

    The US Air Force has ordered an additional 100,000 gallons of Camelina for their second round of flight tests starting next June. The DOD is trying to find a non food-competitive biofuel that can be blended with jetfuel to reduce carbon emissions and is running tests on several kinds of alternative fuels.

    Through contracts with farmers Sustainable Oils planted about 8,000 acres this year mostly in Montana, to make roughly 400,000 gallons of unrefined oil. That was then trucked to Texas to be refined in a pilot program run by Honeywell's UOP LLC division, to turn it into renewable synthetic paraffinic kerosene, which can be blended with jet fuel.

    The Parent company; Seattle-based agricultural biotech firm Targeted Growth supplied the biotechnology resources to Sustainable Oils. They have run more than 140 trials across North America since 2005 to test more than 90 breeding populations of Camelina to analyze agronomic and oil qualities and to develop new high-yielding varieties.

    Camelina or wildflax is an agricultural plant that we first grew for oil in the Bronze Age, and still rotate with wheat crops to replenish soil health. It grows easily on marginal land without water or nitrogen, affected neither by drought nor cold.
    If it works well blended with jet fuel, it would be relatively easy to scale up to demand. It is more cold-resistant than the average biodiesel feedstock, which is key for jet fuels. All these qualities mark Camelina as a good likely second generation biofuel; one that won’t compete with crops for food.
    http://cleantechnica.com/2009/10/10/us-navy-and-air-force-test-homegrown-jetfuel-with-80-less-co2/

    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Dim 11 Oct 2009 - 23:59

    Bonsoir à tous,

    L'US Air Force ne met pas tous ses oeufs dans le même panier. Elle veut aussi procèder à des essais de Biocarburant utilisant la cellulose provenant, entre autres, de la canne à sucre.

    USAF Progresses On Alternative Fuels

    On track to certify its aircraft fleet to use synthetic Fisher-Tropsch (F-T) fuel by 2011, the U.S. Air Force has launched a similar certification effort for hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) biofuels and is now becoming interested in fuels from cellulosic feedstocks.
    “We have a certification schedule for a 50:50 blend of HRJ [and conventional petroleum-based JP-8],” says Bill Harrison, deputy director of the Air Force’s new Energy Office. “We’ve learned a lot through the F-T effort and are hoping for a rather rapid and smooth certification.”
    The Defense Energy Support Center (DESC), which buys fuel for the services, has awarded contracts to supply almost 600,000 gallons of renewable jet fuel for testing and certification. “That’s an unprecedented amount,” says Kim Huntley, DESC commander.
    Sustainable Oils, Solazyme and Honeywell company UOP will supply 400,000 gallons of fuel to the Air Force and 190,000 to the Navy. Sustainable Oils will use camelina as the feedstock, Solazyme will use algae and UOP will use animal fat, or tallow, supplied by food producer Cargill. All three will use UOP’s processing technology.
    Harrison says an aviation biofuels summit held in early September brought in the U.S. agricultural sector to provide guidance on the best feedstock, with a report due out in December. Near term, seed crops like camelina are the most likely sources, he says, while in the mid- to far term cellulosic feedstocks like corn stover look promising,
    “We are really interested in cellulosic, and there is a lot happening,” Harrison says, pointing to the availability of about 1 billion tons of feedstock a year. General Electric is testing jet fuel produced by Amyris Biotechnologies through the direct fermentation of cane sugar to hydrocarbons using engineered yeast. The company has biodiesel pilot plants in Brazil and California and plans to commercialize its jet fuel as early as 2012.
    Under congressional mandate to buy greener fuels, the Air Force is putting the finishing touches to a greenhouse-gas life-cycle analysis model that will allow it to calculate the “well-to-wake” carbon footprint for each batch of fuel. Harrison says benchmark studies are under way for coal-and-biomass-to-liquid F-T jet fuel and soy to HRJ.
    Despite the growing interest in biofuels, DESC has several pilot programs under way to produce synthetic JP-8 from coal and natural gas using the F-T process, Huntley says. The Energy Department, meanwhile, has a $700 million program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal-to-liquid F-T fuel production though carbon capture and sequestration and the addition of biomass, aiming for demonstration by 2012 and deployment by 2020.
    http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story_generic.jsp?channel=aerospacedaily&id=news/FUEL100509.xml&headline=USAF%20Progresses%20On%20Alternative%20Fuels

    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Jeu 15 Oct 2009 - 18:37

    Bonjour à tous,

    L'IATA s'interresse aussi aux biocarburants.

    Aviation: l'IATA table sur 6 à 7% de biocarburants dans les avions en 2020

    L'Agence internationale du transport aérien (IATA) table sur une utilisation de 6 à 7% de biocarburants dans les avions d'ici 2020, un des moyens pour le secteur d'atteindre ses cibles de réduction des émissions de CO2, a indiqué son PDG Giovanni Bisignani mardi à New York.
    "Nous prévoyons d'ici à 2020 d'utiliser 6 à 7% de biocarburants dans nos systèmes", a expliqué M. Bisignani à quelques journalistes, au lendemain d'une rencontre avec le secrétaire général de l'Onu Ban Ki-Moon.
    L'IATA travaille actuellement au développement de biocarburants de seconde génération à base d'algue, de cameline --plante appartenant à la même famille que la moutarde, le chou ou le colza-- ou encore de jatropha --cultivée notamment au Brésil et en Inde pour y fabriquer ds biocarburants-- qui peuvent être mélangés à du kérosène ordinaire.
    "Nous devrions obtenir la certification (de ces biocarburants) l'an prochain", a précisé M. Bisignani, pour qui la principale difficulté sera alors d'accroître suffisamment la production.
    M. Bisignani juge qu'une fois la certification acquise et en escomptant l'arrivée d'investisseurs pour accélérer le développement de ces carburants alternatifs, l'industrie pétrolière devrait à son tour s'impliquer dans ce projet.
    Si la production de ces biocarburants atteint un niveau suffisant, leur coût sera en mesure de concurrencer celui du kérosène classique, estime M. Bisignani.
    ...
    http://www.agefi.com/Quotidien_en_ligne/News/index.php?newsID=230815

    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Lun 23 Nov 2009 - 19:11

    Bonsoir à tous,

    KLM a effectué aujourd'hui le premier vol passager au biocarburant (un carburant contenant du carburant renouvenable). Le mélange en contenait la moitié mais il n'alimentait qu'un réacteur sur les 4 du 747 utilisé. Ce biocarburant est produit à partir de la cameline ou lin batard.

    KLM annonce avoir réalisé un premier vol de passagers au biocarburant

    LA HAYE - La compagnie aérienne néerlandaise KLM a annoncé avoir réalisé lundi le premier vol de passagers au monde avec un Boeing 747 utilisant du biocarburant, qui représentait un huitième de son carburant.
    "Nous avons montré que c'est techniquement possible", s'est félicité le PDG de KLM Peter Hartman dans un communiqué, après avoir participé au vol d'une heure qui avait décollé de l'aéroport d'Amsterdam-Schiphol.
    "Maintenant, il faut que l'Etat, l'industrie et toute la société s'y mettent pour que nous puissions rapidement disposer de carburants durables de façon continue", a-t-il ajouté.
    L'appareil transportait 40 personnes, dont la ministre néerlandaise de l'Economie Marie van der Hoeven, le directeur du Fonds mondial pour la nature (WWF) aux Pays-Bas Johan van de Gronden et des journalistes, a précisé à l'AFP une porte-parole de KLM, Monique Matze.
    Sur les quatre réacteurs de l'avion, un seul était alimenté à 50% par un biocarburant extrait d'une plante appelée cameline (ou camelina) et produit par une société de biotechnologies de Seattle aux Etats-Unis, selon cette source.
    KLM ne veut pas se donner des objectifs précis en matière d'utilisation de biocarburants lors de vols commerciaux, a dit Mme Matze. "La difficulté aujourd'hui réside dans la (faible) disponibilité des biocarburants", a-t-elle estimé.
    "La production de biocarburant ne doit pas mener à des déforestations ou à une utilisation excessive d'eau" et "la production alimentaire ne doit pas être mise en danger", a par ailleurs averti le groupe dans son communiqué.
    "Le développement de biocarburants est une quête dans laquelle KLM applique des critères financiers, techniques et écologiques très stricts", selon la compagnie aérienne.
    http://www.romandie.com/ats/news/091123170249.2j01fpqr.asp

    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Mar 24 Nov 2009 - 16:18

    Bonjour à tous,

    Le biocarburant utilisé lors du vol d'hier est produit par UOP une filliale de Honeywell.

    Honeywell's UOP green jet fuel technology powers biofuel demonstration flight in Europe

    UOP, a Honeywell company, announced that its renewable jet fuel process technology was used to convert second-generation, renewable feedstocks to green jet fuel for a biofuel demonstration flight by KLM Royal Dutch Airlines. UOP's process technology was used to convert oil from camelina, an inedible plant, to green jet fuel for the flight. One engine of a Boeing 747 was powered by a fuel mixture consisting of a 50/50 mix of the green jet fuel and traditional petroleum-derived jet fuel.
    ...
    http://www.avitrader.com/press/printview.aspx?id=11559

    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Mar 15 Déc 2009 - 22:37

    Bonsoir à tous,

    14 compagnies aériennes viennent de signer un protocole d'accord avec AltAir Fuels pour alimenter leurs appareils sur l'aéroport de Seattle.
    Ce biocarburant sera fabriqué à partir de la cameline (lin batard) et mélangé avec du kérosène (pour les avions) ou du gasoil (pourles infrastructures).

    14 Airlines Sign Landmark MOU for Camelina-based Renewable Jet Fuel & Green Diesel

    SEATTLE--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Seattle-based AltAir Fuels today announced it has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with 14 major airlines from the United States, Mexico, Canada and Germany, led by the Air Transport Association (ATA), to negotiate the purchase of up to 750 million gallons of renewable jet fuel and diesel derived from camelina and produced by AltAir Fuels. This unprecedented announcement demonstrates the airlines’ determination to reduce emissions and accelerate the deployment of renewable jet fuel. The renewable fuel, to be produced at a new facility in Anacortes, Wash., would replace about 10 percent of the petroleum fuel consumed annually at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, reducing carbon emissions by about 14 billion pounds over 10 years.

    “Today’s announcement reinforces the proactive steps that airlines are taking to stimulate competition in the aviation fuel supply chain, contribute to the creation of green jobs, and promote energy security through economically viable alternatives that also demonstrate environmental benefits,” said Glenn Tilton, ATA board chairman and UAL Corporation and United Airlines chairman, president and CEO. “Our intention as an airline industry is to continue to do our part by supporting the use of alternative fuels. We urge the U.S. government and the investment community also to do their part to further support this critical energy opportunity,” said Tilton.
    The participating airlines include, American Airlines, Air Canada, Alaska Airlines, Atlas Air, Delta Air Lines, FedEx Express, Hawaiian Airlines, Jet Blue Airways, Lufthansa German Airlines, Mexicana Airlines, Polar Air Cargo, United Airlines, UPS Airlines, and US Airways.
    “Our intent to negotiate a potential purchase with AltAir is an important step on the path to reducing emissions through an affordable and sustainable alternative aviation fuel," said Bill Ayer, Alaska Air Group's chairman and chief executive officer. "Alaska Airlines looks forward to further exploring this promising regional project, which could bring significant environmental benefits and economic opportunities."
    Camelina oil will be converted into both renewable jet fuel and diesel at a new facility to be located at the existing Tesoro oil refinery in Anacortes, Wash. Based on analysis of U.S. Department of Agriculture data for comparable projects, AltAir estimates the project will create hundreds of jobs in a variety of industries, including farming and agricultural logistics, engineering and construction, and operations, maintenance and refining.
    “This is a great example of collaboration among leading Washington state companies to address some of the most pressing issues of our time -- climate change and economic development,” said Governor Christine Gregoire. “Through the leadership of Boeing our state has become known for building world class, innovative airplanes. We will soon become known for producing innovative, low carbon fuels to power them, creating much needed jobs and economic impact along the way.”
    The facility will have a nameplate capacity of 100 million gallons per year, and is slated to begin operations in 2012. The camelina oil will be sourced from Montana-based Sustainable Oils, which has the largest camelina research program in North America and production contracts with numerous farmers and grower cooperatives. AltAir has chosen refining technology developed by UOP, LLC, a Honeywell company, which has already produced biojet fuel for various test flights and U.S. military contracts in 2009.
    “I am pleased to see the aviation community make such an important commitment to the development of sustainable biofuels,” said Jennifer Holmgren, vice president and general manager of Renewable Energy & Chemicals with Honeywell’s UOP. “It is efforts like this one that will guarantee that biofuels made from sustainable, second generation sources can make an impact in the near term.”
    AltAir Fuels’ renewable jet fuel and green diesel are to be blended with petroleum-based jet fuel and diesel at the Tesoro Anacortes refinery, and transported to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and other locations through the existing pipeline system. The renewable jet fuel and diesel produced by AltAir Fuels will be fully compatible with the existing transportation fuel infrastructure, and will require no special handling. The fuel will be consumed by aircraft owned and operated by airlines who have signed the MOU, as well as heavy machinery operated at the Port of Seattle facilities.
    Bruce Smith, Tesoro’s Chairman, President and CEO, said of the company’s involvement in the project, “As an independent manufacturer of fuels, Tesoro is committed to finding new and competitive sources of oil to meet the changing fuel needs of our customers. We at Tesoro are excited to be involved with this innovative technology using domestic, sustainable camelina oil to produce next-generation jet and diesel fuels using the existing assets and expertise that make our company successful.”
    “As an airport committed to environmental stewardship, we are pleased to be in a position to support our airline partners in advancing the goal of using bio jet fuel and reducing CO2 emissions,” said Sea-Tac Airport Managing Director Mark Reis. “We are striving to be an aviation leader for providing commercial bio jet delivery.”
    Camelina is the most heavily tested and proven renewable fuel feedstock, having already powered two commercial aviation test flights – Japan Airlines and KLM – in 2009. In addition, the U.S. military has performed ground engine tests on camelina-based jet fuel in preparation for FA-18 Hornet fighter jet flights planned for spring 2010.
    Boeing is leading the ASTM Emerging Fuels Taskforce, which is working to gain the necessary approvals for bio-derived fuels for aviation. Approval is expected in 2010, with camelina becoming part of a portfolio of biomass sources used to create a sustainable aviation fuel supply.
    Camelina has a number of clear advantages as a feedstock for renewable jet fuel, including:

    1. It is readily available today. Tens of thousands of acres are already under management with hundreds of thousands more planned in the coming years.
    2. Camelina does not require infrastructure modifications. It can be planted and harvested using existing equipment and technology. The fuel can be stored and transported using existing tank and pipelines, and can also be used with existing and unmodified jet and diesel engines.
    3. Camelina-based fuels reduce emissions. A lifecycle analysis of camelina by Michigan Tech University has shown camelina reduces carbon emissions by about 80 percent compared to petroleum fuel.
    4. Camelina seeds have naturally high oil content, and the plant itself requires less water, fertilizer and herbicides, and can also grow on marginal land.
    5. Camelina is grown in rotation with wheat and as such, does not displace food crops. It also provides new sources of revenue and jobs for farmers.
    6. Camelina is inexpensive, since the oil is only usable as a source of renewable fuels. So once the costs and a reasonable margin have been paid to the farmer, the oil can be competitive with crude oil at today’s prices, and potentially even more so if crude oil prices rise.
    “We commend the ATA and its member airlines’ commitment to reducing carbon emissions and the leadership role they have taken in the airline industry,” said Tom Todaro, CEO of AltAir. “Our camelina-based fuels will reduce emissions, provide American farmers additional revenue sources, while creating hundreds of new jobs and reducing our dependency on imported oil. We look forward to replicating this model in other parts of the country and the world in the coming years.”
    About AltAir Fuels
    AltAir Fuels was formed in 2008 to develop projects for the production of jet fuel from renewable and sustainable oils. The company and its partners are designing and building a network of renewable jet-fuel production facilities. The first plant, which will be located in the U.S. and create hundreds of jobs and reduce billions of pounds of carbon emissions, is expected to begin production in late 2012.
    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/14-Airlines-Sign-Landmark-MOU-bw-2625797855.html?x=0&.v=1


    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    Admin
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par Admin le Mer 13 Jan 2010 - 13:49

    Bonjour à tous


    Qatar Airways, Qatar Science & Technology Park and Qatar Petroleum announced establishment of the Qatar Advanced Biofuel Platform, which, with the support of Airbus, will carry out engineering and economic analysis into the development of a sustainable biofuel and "will also look into ways for production and supply," QR said. QABP will focus on creating a detailed engineering/implementation plan for sustainable production, a biofuel investments strategy, an advanced technology development program and market and strategic analyses. QR said it will be a "dedicated end-user" and that specific feedstocks have been identified "which could be developed and processed with the aim of providing access to [biomass-to-liquid] jet fuel for use by Qatar Airways." The airline operated the first gas-to-liquid fuel blend-powered commercial flight with an A340-600 in October and conducted a feasibility study on sustainable BTL jet fuel with QSTP and US-based Verno Systems (ATWOnline, Oct. 16, 2009). The consortium announced its intent to explore the feasibility of GTL fuel at the 2007 Dubai Air Show. It said that while it is moving to the "next phase" of alternative fuels, it will continue "to develop GTL further."

    http://www.atwonline.com/news/other.html?issueDate=1%2F13%2F2010

    Etabliseement d'une plateforme de biofuel au Quatar, avec le support d'Airbus.

    Bonne journée


    _________________
    PONCHO

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Dim 24 Jan 2010 - 19:10

    Bonsoir à tous,

    Les deux géants du secteur se marqueraient ils à la culotte ?
    Boeing y va aussi de son projet de biocarburants dans le Golfe.

    Aérien: projet dans les biocarburants

    Le constructeur aéronautique américain Boeing, son compatriote l'équipementier aéronautique Honeywell, la compagnie aérienne émiratie Etihad et l'Institut de science et technologie de Masdar vont créer un institut de recherche sur les énergies renouvelables, ont-ils annoncé lundi.

    Aucun montant d'investissement n'a été précisé. Le "Projet de recherche pour des énergies renouvelables" (SBRP) sera hébergé par l'Institut de science et technologie de Masdar, situé à Masdar City, ville nouvelle de l'émirat d'Abou Dhabi et qui entend devenir "la première ville au monde sans émissions de Co2".

    Le SBRP "utilisera des systèmes agricoles fonctionnant à l'eau salée pour encourager le développement et la commercialisation de biocarburants pour l'aviation", ont expliqué les quatre partenaires dans un communiqué.

    "Concevoir et commercialiser ces sources d'énergies peu carbonnées est la bonne chose à faire pour notre secteur, pour nos clients et les générations futures", a commenté Jim Albaugh, président de la branche d'aviation commerciale de Boeing, cité dans le communiqué.

    "Pour répondre à la demande croissante d'énergie dans le monde, nous devons identifier des systèmes régionaux de biocarburants qui soient non seulement renouvelables mais puissent régénérer les écosystèmes qui ont été dégradés", poursuit Jennifer Holmgren, directrice de la division de produits chimiques et des énergies renouvelables chez Honeywell.
    http://www.lefigaro.fr/flash-actu/2010/01/18/01011-20100118FILWWW00698-aerien-projet-dans-les-biocarburants.php

    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Jeu 11 Fév 2010 - 18:50

    Bonjour à tous,

    Un article très complet sur le projet auquel participe Boeing à Masdar City aux EAU.
    C'est une ferme aquacole intégrée.
    Je vous laisse lire.

    Un biocarburant pour avions produit par l’aquaculture

    Produire du biocarburant pour les avions sans consommer d’eau douce ni occuper des terres arables ? C’est possible grâce à l’aquaculture intégrée. Un projet des Emirats Arabes Unis produira bientôt dans le désert du biocarburant à partir de la salicorne et avec l'aide de quelques crevettes.

    Tout comme l’automobile, l’aviation est confrontée au double problème des réserves de pétrole et de l’émission de dioxyde de carbone. Cependant, certaines alternatives qui se mettent en place pour le secteur automobile ne sont pas transposables, pour des questions de quantité d'énergie par rapport à la masse.

    Pour l'aviation, les biocarburants en revanche, comme le biogaz, seraient une solution. Mais leur production se heurte à trois problèmes du point de vue du développement durable :



    • Elle entre en compétition avec la production alimentaire pour les ressources en eau douce et en terres arables ;
    • Elle peut, comme toute agriculture intensive, être source de pollutions ;
    • Son bilan carbone peut être élevé à cause de l’utilisation d’énergie pour la production d’engrais ou le travail du sol.
    L’aquaculture intégrée pourrait pourtant produire du biocarburant pour avion en résolvant une partie de ces problèmes. Le Masdar Institute, avec l’appui de l’Arabie Saoudite, de Boeing, d’Etihad Airways (compagnie aérienne émiratie) et d’UOP Honeywell, va développer à Abou Dhabi une ferme aquacole qui utilisera de l’eau de mer pour cultiver de la salicorne.

    Selon John Perkins, Doyen du Masdar Institute, « ce projet démontrera pour la première fois la viabilité économique de l’utilisation de l’aquaculture intégrée pour fournir du biocarburant pour l’aviation, ce qui est conforme avec les objectifs d’Abou Dhabi d’atteindre 7% d’énergie renouvelable d’ici 2020 ».

    La salicorne (Salicornia sp) est une plante halophyte, c'est-à-dire qu’elle se développe en milieu salin. Ses graines riches en huile peuvent être transformées, grâce à la technologie d’UOP Honeywell, en biocarburant.

    Un plant de salicorne, les pieds dans l’eau salée. © M. Buschmann CC by-sa

    Un désert, de l’eau de mer et des crevettes… pour produire du biocarburant

    Le projet porte sur une ferme aquacole de démonstration de deux kilomètres carrés. Située dans le désert, donc en dehors des terres arables, elle sera alimentée en eau de mer par un canal. Cette eau se déversera d’abord dans des bassins aquacoles d’élevage de poissons ou de crevettes. A la sortie de ces bassins, l’eau est chargée en matières organiques (excréments) et pose, en général un problème de pollution.

    Dans cette ferme, cette eau enrichie fertilise des champs de salicorne. En aval de ces champs, l’eau encore faiblement chargée en matières organiques et plus salée, mêlée d’eau du canal, alimente une mangrove qui termine de la dépolluer, capte le CO2 et produit, avec ses feuilles, une partie de l’alimentation des élevages aquacoles.

    Les champs de salicorne sont exploités comme des champs de riz. Toutefois, la forte quantité de sel de cette plante pose un problème pour la mécanisation de son exploitation. Les graines sont pressées et converties en biocarburant pour avion et biocarburant conventionnel dont une partie peut alimenter une centrale électrique. Le rendement de cette aquaculture intégrée est équivalent à celui de la culture du soja mais ne représente qu’un huitième de celle du palmier à huile.

    Cette intégration des productions (c'est cela l'aquaculture intégrée) fournit donc de la nourriture (poissons, crevettes) et du biocarburant, sans eau douce ni terre arable et avec peu d’intrants (fertilisants, nourriture) et d’extrants (pollutions). De ce fait, le bilan carbone de ce biocarburant, qui doit encore être évalué par le Masdar Institute, ainsi que son empreinte environnementale sont améliorés.

    « Le paradigme de l’approvisionnement énergétique change. Pour satisfaire la demande mondiale d’énergie croissante, nous devons identifier des solutions régionales de production de biocarburant qui ne sont pas seulement durables, mais qui peuvent aussi régénérer les écosystèmes qui les produisent » affirme Jennifer Holmgren, vice présidente de Renewable Energy & Chemicals chez UOP Honeywell.

    Dans la lignée de Masdar City, la cité zéro émission d’Abou Dhabi dont dépend le Masdar Institute, ce projet montre les investissements des puissances pétrolières et de l’aviation dans l’après-pétrole. Associé à d’autres projets comme les oasis artificielles et la désalinisation solaire, cette ferme aquacole pourrait être un outil de développement local (production d’eau douce, de nourriture, d’énergie), de lutte contre la désertification et de restauration des écosystèmes (mangrove, forêt).
    http://www.futura-sciences.com/fr/news/t/developpement-durable-1/d/un-biocarburant-pour-avions-produit-par-laquaculture_22545/

    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Mar 16 Fév 2010 - 11:24

    Bonjour à tous,

    British Airways vient de signer un contrat avec la société Solena de Washington pour mettre en place une usine proche de Londres produisant du biocarburant à partir des ordures ménagères de Londres. Le procédé est en deux temps, d'abord obtention de gaz en portant les ordures à haute température, puis transformation de ce gaz par le procédé Fischer-Tropsch. Des tests sont encore à faire pour garantir la sécurité et les performances des appareils utlisant ce carburant.
    73 million de litres de carburéacteur par an sont attendus. En utilisant ce procédé, BA espère obtenir à l'horizon 2050 10 % de sa consommation en carburéacteur. Début en 2014.

    RPT-British Airways biofuel awaiting UK approval-paper

    LONDON, Feb 15 (Reuters) - The biofuel made from municipal waste that will account for a small proportion of British Airways' (BAY.L) jet fuel from 2014, has yet to pass regulatory approval in Britain, according to the Guardian.
    The British airline said on Monday it had signed a deal to purchase all the "sustainable jet fuel" that U.S.-based biofuel company Solena Group could produce from a plant expected to be sited in London and operational from 2014.
    But the DStan department in the Ministry of Defence which regulates aviation fuel in Britain, wants to conduct further tests to make sure the biofuel does not compromise aircraft safety and performance, the paper said.
    A spokesman for the British Airways said safety remained the airline's highest priority.
    "Fischer Tropsch fuel has already been certified in the U.S. ... for use in a 50/50 blend with petroleum jet fuel and we anticipate that the UK's Defence Standards agency will follow suit," the spokesman said in a statement.
    British Airways said it aimed to obtain 10 percent of all its jet fuel from this waste-to-energy process by 2050.
    http://www.reuters.com/article/idAFLDE61E2DX20100216?rpc=44

    L'article de Flight :

    http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2010/02/15/338406/ba-to-use-biofuel-from-planned-new-conversion-plant.html

    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    Beochien
    Juliet Papa

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par Beochien le Ven 30 Avr 2010 - 12:34

    Du biofuel à la moutarde (Ou presque) dans l'état de washington !
    Une graine, de la famille des moutardes, la Camelina, devrait être exploitée à grande échelle sur les terres pauvres, en alternance avec le blé d'hiver!
    L'USAF, la Navy, Boeing et des airliners ... suivent de prés !
    Ne pas oublier que l'USAF et la marine US ont de trés sérieux projets pour réduire leur pétro-dépendance à moyen terme, 50% respectivement pour 2016 et 2020 !
    Ce sont des millions de gallons de fuels alternatifs qui devront être produits et fournis !
    Et ce n'est pas pour déplaire aux agriculteurs US !

    Reste à determiner l'influence des épices fortes et des omégas 3 sur les moteurs, un fort risque de doping ?? Razz

    ---------------------- Extrait du Herald Net -------------------

    http://www.heraldnet.com/article/20100428/BIZ/704289943/1010/BIZ01#Camelina.grows.well.in.Eastern.Washington.and.shows.promise.in.making.biofuel

    Camelina grows well in Eastern Washington and shows promise in making biofuel

    Airline and aircraft manufacturers that are part of the Airline Transportation Action Group have committed by 2015 to making biofuels 1 percent — about 500 million to 600 million gallons — of their annual fuel consumption, a Boeing executive said in February at a clean energy conference in Kennewick.

    The Air Force and Navy also have contracts with a biofuels company to supply it with camelina-based fuel for aircraft and ships.

    Last month, an Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt successfully flew on a 50-50 blend of camelina-based fuel and regular jet fuel, and similar tests are planned with a Navy F-18 and other aircraft.

    Moreover, studies conducted by researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Washington State University have shown camelina can be grown in arid, nonirrigated and marginal soils found in some parts of Eastern Washington.

    Researchers also have found it tolerates cold, needs a minimal amount of water, grows to maturity rapidly, doesn't require much fertilizer and works well as a rotational crop with wheat.

    And it's rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, which are beneficial to heart health. “We're in the pioneering stages of this technology,” said Hal Collins, a research soil microbiologist with the USDA's Agricultural Research Service unit in Prosser who's been part of a team studying camelina and other renewable fuel feedstocks.

    Camelina has shown the most immediate promise for use as an aviation biofuel because of its high oil content — up to 38 percent — and its ability to grow in a variety of climate conditions, said Scott Johnson, president of Sustainable Oils, a camelina company.

    It also can reduce carbon emissions in aviation fuel. An analysis by researchers from Michigan Tech University and others has shown camelina reduces carbon emissions by about 80 percent compared with petroleum fuel, according to Seattle-based AltAir Fuels.

    And it's particularly suited for use in planes “because there's no such thing as a battery-powered aircraft. They are stuck using fuel,” Johnson said.

    America's military is keenly interested in biofuels because of security, economic and environmental concerns.

    The Defense Department accounts for 80 percent of the federal government's energy consumption, with 75 percent of that in fuel, according to a newly released report by the Pew Project on National Security, Energy and Climate.

    The Navy's goal is to use 50 percent alternative fuels in its aircraft and ships by 2020, according to the report. Similarly, the Air Force wants 50 percent of its aviation fuels to come from biofuel blends by 2016, the Pew report said.

    The amount of camelina now in the ground nationwide and in Washington isn't known.

    JPRS

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Mer 5 Mai 2010 - 13:59

    Bonjour Beochien,

    Pour reprendre une info de l'article, un petit compte-rendu des essais de l'US Navy avec un F-18.

    L'US Navy fait voler un F/A-18 Super Hornet avec du biocarburant

    A l'occasion du Jour de la Terre (Hearth Day), le « Green Hornet », comme on l'appelle désormais au sein de l'US Navy, a réalisé hier un vol d'essais à partir de la base aéronavale de Patuxent River. Appartenant à l'Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23, ce F/A-18 Super Hornet avait, dans ses réservoirs, 50% de carburant classique et 50% de biocarburant, fabriqué à partir de la cameline, une plante oléagineuse. Après ce premier essai, 14 autres vols tests sont prévus pour observer le comportement et les performances de l'appareil avec ce mélange, destiné à rendre l'avion plus respectueux de l'environnement. Pour les militaires américains, il s'agit aussi de réduire la dépendance de l'aéronautique navale aux importations de pétrole. « Le programme de tests des carburants alternatifs est une étape majeure dans la certification et l'utilisation opérationnelle de biocarburants par la Navy et le Marine Corp. Il est important de souligner, particulièrement à l'occasion du Jour de la Terre, l'engagement de la marine dans la protection de notre environnement et la réduction de la dépendance au pétrole étranger », a déclaré hier Ray Mabus, secrétaire à la Marine, qui a suivi le vol du « Green Hornet ».
    http://www.meretmarine.com/article.cfm?id=113012



    A cet occasion, le F-18 a volé en supersonique sans rencontrer de différence majeur avec le carburant habituel.
    Des articles plus complets :

    http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/04/23/shock-wave-camelina-biofuels-pass-sound-barrier-in-successful-navy-f-18-trial/
    http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=52768

    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Mar 11 Mai 2010 - 18:17

    Bonjour à tous,

    Dix entreprises brésiliennes (Embraer, TAM, Gol, Azul, Trip, sugar industry group Unica, Algae Biotecnologia, Amyris Brasil, the Brazilian Association of Producers of Jatrophaand and the AIAB) ont scellé ce lundi une alliance nommée Aliança Brasileira para Biocombustíveis de Aviação (Abraba) pour promouvoir l'utilisation dans l'aéronautique des biocarburants.

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/epa/article/ALeqM5iGBsIZlxzWEOrTvOi8qxEOqr7KlA
    http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=356762&CategoryId=14090
    http://www.romandie.com/infos/news2/100510204440.yawcfige.asp

    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Mar 8 Juin 2010 - 22:13

    Bonsoir à tous,

    Une première pour EADS au salon de Berlin.
    EADS a fait voler un Diamond 42 avec un biofuel à 100%, sans le modifier.
    Malheureusement, à la vue de la production actuelle, Airbus n'est pas prêt de remplir les réservoir d'un A380...

    EADS fait voler un avion aux algues

    La maison mère d'Airbus a réussi à faire voler un avion avec un carburant dérivé à 100% d'algues. L'avionneur estime que les biocarburants pourraient représenter jusqu'à 30% du carburant avion utilisé d'ici à 2030.



    Première mondiale dans l'histoire de l'aviation. EADS, maison mère d'Airbus, a fait voler ce mardi matin à Berlin où s'est ouvert le salon aéronautique allemand (ILA), un avion alimenté par un carburant produit à 100% à partir d'algues. L'appareil, un bi-moteur de construction autrichienne le Diamond DA42 NG (New Generation), volera tous les jours pendant toute la durée du salon jusqu'au 13 juin.


    Pour faire voler cet avion, EADS a acheté la «quasi-totalité du kérosène aux algues actuellement produit dans le monde», estime Jean Botti, directeur de la technologie du géant européen de l'aéronautique. Il s'agit de micro-algues de culture élevées par la société allemande IGV. Il faut 100 kilos d'algues pour extraire 22 litres d'huile d'algues qui, une fois raffinée, fournira 21 litres de biocarburant. Le groupe argentin Chubut a réalisé la conversion de la matière première en bio-fioul et l'allemand VTS son adaptation aux besoins de l'aviation.

    EADS juge cette première expérimentation prometteuse. Les algues offrent de nouvelles possibilités en matière de vols neutres en émissions de CO2. En effet, elles rejettent autant de dioxine qu'elles en ont absorbée pendant leur phase de développement. Concrètement, 100 kilos d'algues absorbent 182 kilos de CO2. «la solution idéale est donc de recycler le CO2 émis par l'industrie afin d'accélérer la croissance d'algues en vue de leur transformation en biocraburant», souligne Airbus. L'avionneur a calculé que «le carburant avancé pourrait constituer jusqu'à 30% du carburant avion utilisé d'ici 2030».

    Tout l'enjeu pour l'industrie du transport aérien - il représente environ 2% des émissions polluantes émises par l'homme - est d'avoir accès à un carburant alternatif bon marché et offrant les mêmes caractéristiques (pouvoir calorifique, stabilité et fiabilité, ne gelant pas en altitude..) que le kérosène classique. C'est pourquoi le biocarburant, pour autant qu'il soit possible de produire assez de matières premières qui ne sapent pas les ressources en eau ou en nourriture, est jugé très intéressant par les constructeurs car il peut être utilisé sur les flottes d'avions en service dans le monde sans modification de l'appareil ni de ses moteurs.

    Airbus a décidé d'accélérer en matière de recherche sur les carburants dérivés de plantes ou de la biomasse : micro-algues, salicorne ou encore copeaux de bois. Ce premier vol du Diamond aux algues est donc une étape importante deux ans après une autre première mondiale, en février 2008 : le premier vol commercial effectué (entre Filton en Angleterre et Toulouse en France) d'un A 380 avec un moteur sur quatre alimenté en carburant de synthèse liquide dérivé du gaz naturel GTL.

    Première mondiale dans l'histoire de l'aviation. EADS, maison mère d'Airbus, a fait voler ce mardi matin à Berlin où s'est ouvert le salon aéronautique allemand (ILA), un avion alimenté par un carburant produit à 100% à partir d'algues. L'appareil, un bi-moteur de construction autrichienne le Diamond DA42 NG (New Generation), volera tous les jours pendant toute la durée du salon jusqu'au 13 juin.

    Pour faire voler cet avion, EADS a acheté la «quasi-totalité du kérosène aux algues actuellement produit dans le monde», estime Jean Botti, directeur de la technologie du géant européen de l'aéronautique. Il s'agit de micro-algues de culture élevées par la société allemande IGV. Il faut 100 kilos d'algues pour extraire 22 litres d'huile d'algues qui, une fois raffinée, fournira 21 litres de biocarburant. Le groupe argentin Chubut a réalisé la conversion de la matière première en bio-fioul et l'allemand VTS son adaptation aux besoins de l'aviation.

    EADS juge cette première expérimentation prometteuse. Les algues offrent de nouvelles possibilités en matière de vols neutres en émissions de CO2. En effet, elles rejettent autant de dioxine qu'elles en ont absorbée pendant leur phase de développement. Concrètement, 100 kilos d'algues absorbent 182 kilos de CO2. «la solution idéale est donc de recycler le CO2 émis par l'industrie afin d'accélérer la croissance d'algues en vue de leur transformation en biocraburant», souligne Airbus. L'avionneur a calculé que «le carburant avancé pourrait constituer jusqu'à 30% du carburant avion utilisé d'ici 2030».

    Pas de modification de l'appareil

    Tout l'enjeu pour l'industrie du transport aérien - il représente environ 2% des émissions polluantes émises par l'homme - est d'avoir accès à un carburant alternatif bon marché et offrant les mêmes caractéristiques (pouvoir calorifique, stabilité et fiabilité, ne gelant pas en altitude..) que le kérosène classique. C'est pourquoi le biocarburant, pour autant qu'il soit possible de produire assez de matières premières qui ne sapent pas les ressources en eau ou en nourriture, est jugé très intéressant par les constructeurs car il peut être utilisé sur les flottes d'avions en service dans le monde sans modification de l'appareil ni de ses moteurs.

    Airbus a décidé d'accélérer en matière de recherche sur les carburants dérivés de plantes ou de la biomasse : micro-algues, salicorne ou encore copeaux de bois. Ce premier vol du Diamond aux algues est donc une étape importante deux ans après une autre première mondiale, en février 2008 : le premier vol commercial effectué (entre Filton en Angleterre et Toulouse en France) d'un A 380 avec un moteur sur quatre alimenté en carburant de synthèse liquide dérivé du gaz naturel GTL.
    http://www.lefigaro.fr/societes/2010/06/08/04015-20100608ARTFIG00463-eads-fait-voler-un-avion-aux-algues.php

    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    Beochien
    Juliet Papa

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par Beochien le Mer 9 Juin 2010 - 1:21

    Bonjour !

    Merci Julienaline !

    Noter que ce sont 2 Mercédés diesel de 2L qui tournent sur cet avion !
    Ca aurait marché pareil avec la 200D du taxi du coin !

    Et recourir le monde pour en trouver un réservoir ... suffit d'aller voir les US, ils sont lancés eux, pour des milliers de gallons expérimentaux, des millions trés bientôt, et des milliards pour la fin de la décennie !

    De la musique de Jounaleux !
    Et EADS qui s'amuse, avec un avion, même pas de leur groupe ! violon
    Ils auraient du essayer avec le A400M !
    Ya plus de place pour peindre sa pub ! en avion

    JPRS

    Admin
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par Admin le Mer 9 Juin 2010 - 9:08

    Salut Jullienaline
    Salut Beochien

    La mercedes 200D du taxi brousse ou de iakoutsk présente une différence importante :

    Elle reste au ras du sol et son carburant n'est pas exposé de manière prolongé à des températures très négatives... (encore qu'à iakousk.... Wink )

    Ce qui reste sur, c'est que la mer va continuer à filer un grand coup de pouce à l'humanité


    _________________
    PONCHO

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Ven 18 Juin 2010 - 22:39

    Bonsoir à tous,

    P&WC est à la recherche d'un avionneur pour faire voler un appareil à l'aide de biocarburants. Cela serait en bonne voie.
    Un chiffre intéressant est donné : l'utilisation d'un biocarburant dégagerait de 1 à 1,5 % de chaleur en plus qu'un carburant conventionnel. A suivre.

    Biocarburants: P&WC à la recherche d'un partenaire

    (Montréal) Pratt & Whitney Canada (P&WC) est sur le point de se trouver un partenaire avionneur qui acceptera de faire voler un appareil à l'aide de biocarburants.

    «Nous sommes en négociations, ça va bien, a déclaré le responsable du dossier des biocarburants chez P&WC, Sam Sampath, au cours d'une séance d'information organisée pour les médias hier. Il y aura une annonce d'ici la fin de l'année, peut-être à l'occasion d'un salon aéronautique.»
    P&WC a entrepris divers projets de recherche sur l'utilisation de biocarburants, notamment dans le cadre d'un partenariat public-privé impliquant des entreprises canadiennes et indiennes. Les partenaires indiens travaillent notamment sur la graine de jatropha, plante originaire de l'Amérique centrale qui s'est propagée dans plusieurs régions tropicales et sous-tropicales, notamment en Inde. Les partenaires canadiens regardent plutôt du côté de la cameline, qui pousse plutôt aux États-Unis et dans les régions plus nordiques. On en trouve notamment en Saskatchewan.
    M. Sampath a indiqué que les algues avaient également beaucoup de potentiel, mais à plus long terme.

    Avant de faire voler un appareil propulsé par des biocarburants, P&WC et ses partenaires doivent faire des études sur la combustion proprement dite, mais aussi sur la compatibilité des matériaux des moteurs avec ces nouveaux carburants. C'est que la chaleur dégagée par les biocarburants est de 1 à 1,5% supérieure à celle dégagée par le carburant conventionnel.
    Bombardier s'est également montrée intéressée par les biocarburants, mais elle n'a pas voulu indiquer si elle était sur le point de s'engager à participer à des essais en vol.
    Le porte-parole de Bombardier Aéronautique, Marc Duchesne, a simplement indiqué que Bombardier faisait partie de regroupements comme la Commercial Aviation Alternative Fuels Initiative et la Society of American Engineers, qui font de la recherche sur la question des carburants.
    Il a toutefois rappelé que la diminution des émissions de gaz à effet de serre ne dépendait pas uniquement du type de carburant utilisé, mais aussi de la conception des appareils.
    «Il faut dessiner des avions plus efficaces, au profil aérodynamique amélioré, équipés de moteurs plus efficaces, a-t-il déclaré. Comme la CSeries.»
    P&WC est présentement en train de développer un nouveau moteur, le PW800, qui équipera la CSeries et le Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ). Le motoriste peut effectuer certaines études sur l'utilisation de biocarburants avec ce moteur, mais jusqu'à un certain point.
    «Nous ne pouvons pas travailler en isolation, a déclaré le vice-président de P&WC responsable du programme PW800, Dan Breitman. Il faut travailler en partenariat avec les avionneurs. Nous en avons parlé avec eux, mais de façon informelle.»
    http://lapresseaffaires.cyberpresse.ca/economie/energie-et-ressources/201006/17/01-4290781-biocarburants-pwc-a-la-recherche-dun-partenaire.php

    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    jullienaline
    Whisky Charlie

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par jullienaline le Ven 18 Juin 2010 - 23:07

    Rebonsoir,

    Boeing, avec l'aide de l'Armée de l'air néerlandaise, a fait voler un hélicoptère Apache avec un mélange à 50-50 de biocarburant et de kérosène traditionnel. Il est à noter que le biocarburant est obtenu à partir d'algues et d'huile de friture . Qu'en est-il de l'odeur ?
    Cela pourrait rendre repérable l'Apache !

    Eurosatory 2010: Industry celebrates first helicopter biofuel flight

    The first flight of a helicopter using a bio-kerosene blend has marked the dawn of a new era for rotorcraft aviation, according to industry officials.
    On 16 June a Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) Boeing AH-64D Apache attack helicopter carried out a 20 minute flight test at Gilze-Rijen Airbase using a blend of sustainable bio-kerosene and standard aviation jet fuel.
    Speaking to Rotorhub.com at the Eurosatory exhibition in Paris, a Boeing spokesman said the milestone, which was made possible by a team that included the RNLAF, Boeing, Honeywell, and engine manufacturer GE Aviation, was a key part of the company’s efforts to develop sustainable aviation fuel solutions.
    ‘We are witnessing the dawn of a new era for rotorcraft. Boeing is proud to have the Apache at the forefront,’ the spokesman said.
    Under the ‘Green Jet Fuel’ process developed by Honeywell subsidiary UOP, natural oils from algae and used cooking oil were converted into a Bio-Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene (Bio-SPK), which was blended in a 50% mixture with traditional jet fuel.
    The blend was then used to power one of the Apache's engines for a series of test manoeuvres. No modifications were made to the engine or airframe for the flight and the blend met or exceeded the JP-8 fuel specifications for the Apache.
    The RNLAF biofuel flight test programme will encompass seven flights, in an attempt to highlight the technical feasibility of flying rotorcraft using renewable fuels.
    In a statement, Boeing Northern Europe president Jan Närlinge said it was hoped that the programme would also help to stimulate market development for aviation biofuel within the Netherlands to help improve the environmental performance of commercial and military aviation.
    The Honeywell Green Jet Fuel process was developed under a contract awarded in 2007 by the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to produce an aviation biofuel that can be blended with petroleum-based fuel.
    The blend has previously been used in fixed-wing flights with the US Air Force and Navy as part of a joint programme for alternative fuels testing and certification under the US Defense Energy Support Center as well as for commercial biofuel demonstration flights, including a KLM Royal Dutch Airlines demonstration flight in November 2009.
    Meanwhile, EADS announced that it was considering the creation of an aviation biofuel production facility in Brazil.
    Under a cooperative agreement signed at the ILA Berlin Air Show, EADS, Eurocopter and BioCombustibles del Chubut will perform feasibility studies using microalgae farming to produce aviation-grade biofuel. The feasibility of helicopter flight tests with the biofuel is also currently being assessed.
    http://www.shephard.co.uk/news/rotorhub/eurosatory-2010-industry-celebrates-first-helicopter-biofuel-flight/6577/


    Amicalement


    _________________
    Jullienaline

    Vector
    Whisky Quebec

    Re: BioCarburant

    Message par Vector le Ven 18 Juin 2010 - 23:53

    Ben c'est pas possible ou alors ce sont des Belges flamands, pour le frites. Ils ont leur indépendance... énergétique.

      La date/heure actuelle est Jeu 23 Oct 2014 - 1:52