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Capsule ORION

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87_Arnac

Capsule ORION

Message par 87_Arnac le Lun 19 Oct 2009 - 15:26

Bonjour tout le monde

J'ose créer un petit sujet pour rebondir sur un article de Flighthglobal que je vien de consulter...

Intéressant de lire la conclusion de la NASA sur la nature des matériaux pour une telle application.
C'est évidemment pas transposable au monde de l'aéronautique...


NASA: Aluminium-lithium Orion better than composites
By Stephen Trimble
A NASA programme manager confirms aluminium-lithium remains the favoured material to serve as the primary structure for the Orion crew module despite an ongoing, two-year programme to develop a mostly composite alternative.

A switch to a relatively unknown structural material would force NASA to invest in a risky and uncertain certification programme in order to fly a human-rated habitation module in space, says Mike Kirsch, programme manager for the composite crew module programme.

"We don't have that much experience certifying composites," Kirsch says. "So there is some uncertainty in scoping the amount that's required to certify this."

Some NASA officials, including former administrator Michael Griffin, promoted composite materials as a potentially superior materials technology compared to even advanced metal alloys, such as aluminium-lithium.

These supporters launched the composite crew module programme for NASA and its contractors to gain practical experience designing and manufacturing the technology for a human-rated spacecraft.

Last year, Michael Saemisch, a Lockheed Orion team member, blamed the composite programme for delaying the preliminary design review of the aluminium-lithium Orion module by several months.

Composites technology has gained widespread use in the aerospace sector as a stronger material than aluminium that can also be lighter and less expensive to manufacture.

By many measures, the composite crew vehicle designed and manufactured by NASA and an industry team led by ATK has been a success. ATK's composites plant in Iuka, Mississippi, delivered the module to the NASA Langley Research Center on 11 September, says Steve Summitt, ATK's programme manager.

In pressure tests to date, the module has performed "scary close" to analytical predictions, Kirsch says. Structural testing is scheduled to continue until the end of the year.

But the design process also revealed unexpected weaknesses for composites technology. The final design weighs about the same as aluminium-lithium, and is not significantly cheaper, Kirsch says. "I don't think it would be better," he adds.

The NASA design assumed the pressurised structure must remain leak-proof and intact despite sustaining heavy damage, he says. This design requirement added bulk to the structure, negating some of the weight-savings normally expected with composites.

Moreover, the crew module must sustain 31,751kg (70,000lb) loads during the abort sequence, requiring a material that remains strong against loads from multiple directions, whereas composite material is best when needed to be stiff against loads coming from only one direction, Kirsch says.


http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2009/10/19/333602/nasa-aluminium-lithium-orion-better-than-composites.html

Très intéressant.

Héphaistos doit forcément être très content depuis sa forge !


Amitiés

aubla
Whisky Quebec

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par aubla le Lun 19 Oct 2009 - 15:39

pour construire ORION, nouveau véhicule spatial habité de la NASA,
l'alliage aluminium-lithium serait-il supérieur aux composites ?

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2009/10/19/333602/nasa-aluminium-lithium-orion-better-than-composites.html

Les avantages apparents des composites (poids, facilité d'usinage, coût . . .) disparaitraient quand toutes les contraintes de résistance sont prises en compte.
Ne voit-on pas là ce qui est en train de se passer avec le B787 ?

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Lun 19 Oct 2009 - 15:47

Merci Aubla...

Je vois que vous et 87_Arnac êtes sur la même longueur d'onde, ou en tout cas sur les mêmes interrogations...


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jullienaline
Whisky Charlie

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par jullienaline le Lun 21 Déc 2009 - 18:53

Bonjour à tous,

Pour rebondir sur l'article précédent, le Composite Crew Module (CCM), l'alternative en composite de la capsule Orion, poursuit son développement. Elle aurait passé avec succès des tests grandeurs natures de résistance.
Qu'en pensez-vous cher 87_Arnac ?

Au passage, l'article parle d'un logiciel , HyperSizer, dont le but est de dimenssionner au plus juste les structures en composites.
Il est apparemment utilisé par beaucoup d'entreprises, principalement américaines.
Quelqu'un le connait-il ?

Composite Crew Module passes critical NASA tests



Collier Research Corp. (Hampton, Va. USA) has announced that a series of critical, full-scale, physical tests just completed by NASA on the Composite Crew Module (CCM) proved that Collier's HyperSizer structural sizing and composite analysis software accurately predicted the CCM's successful performance under simulated flight conditions.
The CCM is an all-composite alternative for the flight crew module Orion, which is part of NASA's Constellation program to return man to the Moon and/or Mars. The successful outcome of the recent tests is seen as a major milestone in the design of human-rated spacecraft that points towards increased use of lightweight composites in space vehicles.
HyperSizer software was used throughout the almost three-year project to optimize the design, weight and manufacturability of the CCM, which is constructed of honeycomb sandwich and solid laminate composites. The tests were conducted by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) at Langley Research Center (Langley, Va. USA), which is using the CCM project to study materials tradeoffs between metals and composites in space structures.
"The CCM is an alternative for the metallic crew module, but it has also represented an opportunity for the NASA family to get up the curve on experience with composites," said CCM project manager Mike Kirsch. "Our analytical models predicted the response very well and now we're much better informed to make good material tradeoffs for future spacecraft."
HyperSizer is a structural sizing and design optimization tool that works in a feedback loop with finite element analysis (FEA) to automatically search for solutions that minimize weight and maximize manufacturability. For the CCM, HyperSizer guided design and manufacturing decisions throughout the product development process.
"HyperSizer gave us a view into what the physics were doing," said Kirsch. "We could zoom in on the architecture, refine the design, trade solutions and evaluate mass and manufacturability very quickly." The software was also the primary communications tool used to display analytical results during five different technical reviews with industry and agency experts.
Load testing of the CCM involved blanketing the vehicle with 280 linear strain gages and 80 acoustic sensors that listened for fiber breaks in the composite layups. The structure successfully withstood tests of loads applied to the structure to simulate launch abort and parachute deployment. Then came the most critical test of internal pressure, which required the CCM to withstand twice standard atmosphere pressure (31 psi) in order to meet the required NASA safety factor of two. Although additional testing involving intentional damage of the CCM will continue into early 2010, passing the internal pressure test was essential for keeping the module development program on track.
"This project clearly demonstrates HyperSizer's ability to accurately predict the behavior of large composite structures, with exacting design and manufacturing requirements," said Craig Collier, president of Collier Research Corp. and the original programmer of the software. "The use of composites continues to expand across new industries as manufacturers look for ways to safely and cost-effectively replace heavier materials. HyperSizer can be an important tool for ensuring the integrity and optimal performance of the design engineering teamís work."

http://www.compositesworld.com/news/composite-crew-module-passes-critical-nasa-tests.aspx

Amicalement


_________________
Jullienaline

TRIM2

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par TRIM2 le Mar 22 Déc 2009 - 15:48

Bonjour à tous,

ORION n'est qu'un projet dont le seul modèle est incapable de 'remonter' l'orbite d'ISS

Un projet d'ORION, non pressurisé, cylindrique, non budgété, bon étudié..a été décrit.

Il pourrait..se connecter sur le module Russe , seul point pour pousser droit.

Seul l'ATV...?

Quant à SpaceX.., même si ils accédaient à ISS avec des astro-cosmonautes.. en 2010..pure lubie à mon point de vue, serait incapable de pousser ISS.

Alors,Soyouz Progress...

TRIM2

jullienaline
Whisky Charlie

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par jullienaline le Sam 6 Mar 2010 - 16:52

Bonjour à tous,

Le premier bouclier thermique vient d'être terminé.

Lockheed Martin Orion Team Fabricates World’s Largest Heat Shield Structure



Innovative high-temperature material system to provide better crew protection

DENVER, March 1st, 2010 -- The Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT]-led team developing the Orion crew exploration vehicle achieved a major technology milestone by completing fabrication of the world’s largest heat shield structure. The shield is five meters (16.4 feet) in diameter and is critical to the protection of the spacecraft and its crew from the extreme temperatures experienced during re-entry. The work was completed at Lockheed Martin’s composite development facility in Denver, Colo.
The crew exploration vehicle is at the height of its development phase, which has spurred several new technologies and innovations such as a cutting edge high-temperature composite material system. The new system was developed by the Lockheed Martin Orion thermal protection system team in partnership with TenCate Advanced Composites, a leading supplier of aerospace thermoset and thermoplastic prepregs. TenCate’s composite materials are used in commercial aircraft, radomes, satellites, general aviation, oil and gas, medical and high-end industrial applications.
“In addition to the technology advancement, we achieved a $10 million cost savings and improved the project schedule by 12 months through the innovative tooling, materials and fabrication processes the team put into action,” explained Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin vice president and Orion program manager.
The new resin system was developed over an 18-month period during which thousands of coupons were tested in extreme environments that simulated a ballistic re-entry from a lunar mission. The team verified that the thermal insulator on the outside of the composite material can be thinner due to the higher temperature capability, resulting in improved mass optimization of the Orion spacecraft.
The new resin system enables much simpler and more efficient manufacturing techniques compared to other high temperature resin systems. This resin system has the potential to be used in a wide range of commercial applications including aircraft, automobiles, launch vehicles, payload fairings, and re-entry vehicles.

The expansive heat shield will be applied to the Orion ground test article, which is the first full-sized, flight-like test article for Orion being built at the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, La. The ground test article is designed to serve as a production pathfinder to validate the flight vehicle production processes and tools. When completed, the crew module will be tested on the ground in equivalent flight-like environments, including static vibration, acoustics and water landing loads. This early high fidelity testing is necessary to correlate sizing models for all subsystems on the vehicle.
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/press_releases/2010/0301_ss_orion.html

Amicalement


_________________
Jullienaline

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Jeu 15 Avr 2010 - 22:59

Bonsoir à tous,

Je suis en train de lire quelques lignes intéressantes sur Orion

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?PHPSESSID=ee3ae4c52b5efa1b9632af9978faa9d2&topic=21253.45


La version CRV pourrait être lancée à vide, sans système de sauvetage et sans développer un lanceur "man rated"...

Ce qui laisse du temps pour la mise au point de celui-ci

A suivre



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Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Ven 23 Avr 2010 - 8:42

Bonjour à tous

Ce qui ce lit sur les conséquences de la nouvelle politique d'Obama pour l'espace, c'est que finalement il n'y aura paq grand chose à mettre à la poubelle de Constellation

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/hyperbola/


A commencer par Orion



The Orion crew exploration vehicle looks set to return not only as an escape capsule but also as a beyond low Earth orbit spacecraft according to NASA administrator Charles Bolden

In today's Senate appropriations subcommittee hearing Bolden said that Orion would become a programme of incremental improvement to realise a spacecraft that can conduct missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO)

On 1 February this year Orion was effectively cancelled by president Barack Obama's fiscal year 2011 (starting 1 October 2010) NASA budget and then on 15 April Obama declared that the Lockheed Martin developed spacecraft would be an escape capsule. But Obama's plan for NASA also envisages human missions beyond the Moon to asteroids and Mars

Now Bolden appears to have given back to Orion the mission it was to have originally, going beyond LEO

Bolden also indicated that he expected Orion to be able to begin operation as an escape capsule in three years, long before any commercial provider. He said he saw the likes of Space Exploration Technologies' (SpaceX) Dragon capsule as a longer term but cheaper prospect

This would seem to be a blow to the hopes of those companies planning to be a part of NASA's $6 billion commercial crew programme. In particular SpaceX which has stated it could deliver an ISS crew transport vehicle three years after being given the go-ahead

Et probablement Ares I

Et



In a president George W. Bush-like moment NASA administrator Charles Bolden is reported to have said: "it is the uneasiest thing we could do". Uneasiest? Don't you mean it is one of the hardest things you could do?

And Bolden might not want to admit it but his allegedly executable non-Constellation programme is ultimately, in capabilities terms, just as challenging and probably unexecutable as Bush's Constellation in technology and funding

Why? We now know that president Barack Obama's plan for NASA is to work towards a 2025 asteroid rendezvous and a mid-2030s Mars mission that would not land. Constellation had Mars as an aspiration but its goal was to begin Moon missions from 2018 with a landing soon after and the slow build up of a permanent lunar base from the early 2020s

Surely they are very different? Look again
The asteroid mission is, so we're told, going to take months of travel very likely beyond the Moon. It will need a crew vehicle to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere, it will need a habitat module for the journey out to the asteroid. To go beyond lunar orbit and come back will require a large Earth departure stage and asteroid departure stage, or at least a large propellant tank. For mass savings the propellant will probably need to be cryogenic, requiring good insulation technology. It will need an in-space manouvering engine system to fly in formation with the asteroid. It will need RADAR or LIDAR for that formation flying and if the intention is to land the habitat, crew vehicle stack will need its own legs and an engine that acts as a "descent" and ascent thruster. Or this asteroid lander would have its own "descent" and ascent stages. Once on the surface or in close formation the stack will need good thermal management as it passes in and out of the harsh sunlight. If the plan is to land the asteroid is likely to tumble through space making landing more difficult. This will require some sort of automatic manouvering system to compensate for that multiple axes movement

To get this lander-habitat-crew vehicle stack beyond Moon orbit it will need to be launched into low Earth orbit as one spacecraft or assembled from its constituent parts in LEO. Its not this blog posts intention to detail the physical characteristics of these craft but to show what capabilities are needed. But it can be summised that the crew vehicle could probably be launched by a modified EELV-type booster but the departure stages for Earth and asteroid and the habitat, with its manouvering/descent/ascent engines and all their propellant tanks are going to be far larger. Perhaps they would need a heavy lift rocket, maybe the habitat and departures stages could be launched propellant empty and refuelled in orbit? This architectural issue will be address at the end of this blog post

For now, how is this asteroidship just like Constellation's Orion crew exploration vehicle, Altair stack?

Orion was designed to go to the Moon ultimately for a seven month mission, it would enter lunar orbit and operate automaticaly while its crew descended to the surface in Altair. Initially the missons would be for a week or a gfew weeks operating form the lander. However the crew would ultimately live on the Moonbase once it has adequate accomodation

Like the asteroidship Constellation has a crew vehicle capable of long endurance in deep space and able to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. Like the asteroid ship a habitat, in this case called the Altair lunar lander, will be used and Altair's pressurised section and life support systems would have laid the groundwork for technlogies for the Moonbase habitat modules, which were to be landed by Altair's descent stage. To reach the Moon and return from it large Earth departure and lunar departure stages are needed. Constellation's heavy lift Ares V cargo launch vehicle's upper stage was to be the EDS and Altair was to have the LDS. For mass savings the propellant has already been decided to be cryogenic, requiring good insulation technology; just like the asteroidship.

Focusing on Altair, like the asteroidship it will need RADAR or LIDAR to land on the Moon and like the habitat-crew vehicle stack it will need its own legs and its own descent and ascent stages. Once on the surface Altair and/or the Moonbase habitat modules will need good thermal management as it passes in and out of the harsh sunlight during the lunar day or is permanently in sunlight. What Altair will not need is an automatic landing, real-time adaptive manouvering system that has to cope with a tumbling landing surface

Finally, Constellation's Ares I crew launch vehicle was to launch Orion that would rendezvous with the EDS and Altair, which were orbited by Ares V

What can be seen is that the capabilities of Constellation's Orion and Altair and Ares V upper stage are all directly useful for the asteroid mission. Call it what you like but something very much like Orion and very much like Altair and very much like the Ares V EDS will fly to an asteroid whether that path is flexible with few dates or has a cast iron schedule, as cast iron as any spaceflight programme can be

Having demonstrated that all the technologies and the crew vehicle capabilities and in-space systems developed and in development for Constellation are completely applicable to Bolden's asteroid mission the next issue this blog post will deal with is, how to get into LEO

Do you use the Ares family or do you use other launch vehicles, launched multiple times, perhaps in tandem with in-orbit fuel resupply?

For the Ares family you are using a permanently manned spaceport with personnel and equipment specific to the Ares rockets. That workforce will launch two Ares Is and two Ares Vs every year

The other option is to use a modified existing booster for the crew vehicle. But for that booster to have a higher flight rate than Ares I, and therefore better economics, it will have to be able to launch a deep space crew vehicle although its primary commercial mission may be for smaller payloads.

If the EDS and habitat cum asteriod lander can be launched by the deep space crew vehicle's booster all to the good. Perhaps this mystery universal booster can also launch the fuel depots? But now you are looking at three launches for the crew vehicle, habitat and EDS and another three, one would imagine, for three "fuel depot spacecraft" to launch the maximum possible propellant to resupply the aforementioned vehicles. Six launches instead of Constellation's two and six LEO rendezvous - best of luck with that mission control!

Either way this universal rocket does not sound like a booster that already exists. A human rated vehicle that is probably going to have to put at least 45,000kg, the Altair's mass, into LEO. This assumes for the asteroid mission that the larger beyond lunar orbit propellant assembly makes up the difference in mass where the habitat cum lander is not fuelled on launch (unlike Altair) but has on-orbit fuel resupply. The conclusion can only be that a new booster has to be designed and developed

The Ares V upper stage technologies are clearly already needed for the asteroidship, so isn't it obvious that the Ares V first stage and solid rocket booster systems are too? Yet Bolden is prepared to wait another five years, to 2015, before making a decision for the glaringly obvious

One last point about the economics of all this. Much has been made that the Constellation programme was proposing only two flights a year to the Moon for crew transport for the permanent human presence of a research station, probably at a southern lunar pole (It should be said that many more Ares V launches for cargo bearing Altair's would be needed but that was never part of the argument)

So what does Obama and Bolden's plan have to say about this economic batch quantity of launches its proponents criticised Consetllation for? Their plan is proposing one mission, one flight to an asteroid, in 2025 after spending billions and using all the technology that would have been needed for Constellation anyway. And the only apparent advantage is that a multiple launch on-orbit rendezvous and fuel resupply architecture might make better use of ground infrastructure and launch personnel, if you can develop this universal rocket

With all that in mind what makes the Obama/Bolden plan so much better than Constellation? At the beginning of this blog post there is a chart that was used by Bolden's deputy Lori Garver at a recent conference and it gives approximate dates for everything envisaged under the Bolden plan

What can be seen in the chart is that despite NASA's budget increases being smaller than those recommended by the US human spaceflight review, Bolden's plan will need to have all the Constellation systems for the asteroidship and launch it at the same time NASA would have been setting up a Moonbase; and fund the International Space Station extension to 2020 and beyond; have flagship, and "small", technology demonstations; start commercial crew services; research exploration technology and send robotic precursor missions to, one assumes asteroids and Mars

Who is unexecutable now Mr Bolden?



A suivre Wink


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jullienaline
Whisky Charlie

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par jullienaline le Dim 16 Mai 2010 - 22:23

Bonsoir à tous, Il faut avoir le coeur, et le reste, bien accroché :

La semaine dernière, le 6 mai , la NASA a procédé au premier essai complet du système de sauvetage de la capsule.
Impressionnant ! L'accélération la plus forte se situe dans les 2,5 premières secondes ce qui donne 720 km/h au bout de 3 secondes !!!



NASA Successfully Tests Orion Launch Abort System

WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE, N.M. -- NASA's Pad Abort 1 flight test, a launch of the abort system designed for the Orion crew vehicle, lifted off at 7 a.m. MDT Thursday at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) near Las Cruces, N.M. The flight lasted about 135 seconds from launch until the crew module touchdown about a mile north of the launch pad.

The flight was the first fully-integrated test of this launch abort system design. The information gathered from the test will help refine design and analysis for future launch abort systems, resulting in safer and more reliable crew escape capability during rocket launch emergencies.

"Through hard work and incredible dedication over the past several years, the Orion Pad Abort 1 team has successfully tested the first U.S. designed abort system since Apollo," said Doug Cooke, associate administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "This system is much more advanced in capability and technology than any abort system designed in the past. NASA strives to make human spaceflight as safe as possible, and what we learned here today will greatly contribute to that goal."

The test involved three motors. An abort motor produced a momentary half-million pounds of thrust to propel the crew module away from the pad. It burned for approximately six seconds, with the highest impulse in the first 2.5 seconds. The crew module reached a speed of approximately 445 mph in the first three seconds, with a maximum velocity of 539 mph, in its upward trajectory to about 1.2 miles high.

The attitude control motor fired simultaneously with the abort motor and steered the vehicle using eight thrusters producing up to 7,000 pounds of thrust. It provided adjustable thrust to keep the crew module on a controlled flight path and reorient the vehicle as the abort system burned out.

The jettison motor, the only motor of the three that would be used in all nominal rocket launches, pulled the entire launch abort system away from the crew module and cleared the way for parachute deployment and landing. After explosive bolts fired and the jettison motor separated the system from the crew module, the recovery parachute system deployed. The parachutes guided the crew module to touchdown at 16.2 mph (24 feet per second), about one mile from the launch pad.

The Orion Project has begun the process of recovering all of the test articles from the WSMR range and will be evaluating all of the data over the coming weeks.

The Orion Project office at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston led the launch abort system test team. System development is led by NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va., in partnership with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Langley designed and produced the boilerplate crew module for the flight test.

NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards, Calif., prepared the crew module for integration and led the flight test vehicle integration at WSMR with Lockheed Martin Corp. of Denver, the prime contractor to NASA for Orion. The nearby NASA White Sands Test Facility provided design, construction and management for the launch and ground facilities at WSMR, as well as personnel on the integration and launch preparation team.

Lockheed led the industry team development efforts for the launch abort system. Orbital Sciences Corporation of Dulles, Va., provided design, development and support of the system; Alliant Techsystems, or ATK, of Magna, Utah, developed the abort and the attitude control motors; Aerojet of Sacramento, Calif., developed the jettison motor; and Honeywell of Morristown, N.J., provided the avionics for onboard control of abort sequencing and inertial navigation.

For more information about the Pad Abort 1 flight test, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/orion
http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2010/may/HQ_10-109_Orion_Test.html

Amicalement


_________________
Jullienaline

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Mar 10 Jan 2012 - 12:52



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Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Jeu 10 Jan 2013 - 17:35

Bonjour à tous

Orion est un peu lourde pour le moment....

Mais la réserve de puissance du lanceur semble ok

Pas bon par contre pour les parachutes

http://www.aviationweek.com/Article.aspx?id=/article-xml/asd_01_09_2013_p05-01-534634.xml&p=1


n integrated systems definition review of NASA’s three human
exploration elements — launcher, capsule and ground systems — kicks off
next week, with major items of discussion to include the schedule for
developing the Space Launch System (SLS) core stage and the Orion crew
capsule’s weight.The three-day review at Johnson Space Center
will build on previous design work on the SLS, Orion and modifications
at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., to make sure all of the requirements and
interface control documents match up.
The SLS core stage is the
“critical path” to the first flight test of an unmanned Orion
multipurpose crew vehicle atop an early variant of the SLS in 2017,
according to Dan Dumbacher, deputy associate administrator for
exploration systems, and the Orion capsule weighs about 4,000 lb. more
than its recovery parachutes can handle. Both issues are tractable, he
says.
“Just before the holidays they completed the preliminary
design review [PDR] on the core stage,” he said Jan. 7. “Doing the
review, we actually came through pretty clean, so we’re gaining some
confidence. Obviously, we have hardware in front of us [and] Mother
Nature has a wonderful way of keeping us all humble.”
'Acceptable risk'
The
PDR determined the big rocket’s main stage can meet requirements
“within acceptable risk,” and can be integrated with the surplus RS-25D
space shuttle main engines that will power it for the first few flights.
Combined with the solid-fuel, shuttle-derived boosters and other
planned launch hardware, the initial SLS variant has enough extra
capability to handle the overweight Orion capsule.
Specifications
call for the Orion capsule and its service module to weigh 73,500 lb. at
liftoff. Lately the capsule has been running “something like 4,000” lb.
over its allotted weight, Dumbacher says. The service module is about
1,200 lb. too heavy.
While the baseline SLS probably can handle
the extra weight, the parachutes that will bring the capsule back to a
water landing after re-entry cannot, Dumbacher says. Going into the
integrated review, design teams have been wringing out the extra weight
on the capsule, he says, and an upcoming flight test atop a Delta IV
heavy may allow engineers to cut their margins to save more weight.
Scheduled
for September 2014, the flight test will take an Orion test article
through a highly elliptical orbital trajectory designed to bring it back
into the atmosphere at about 80% of the velocity it would see returning
from the Moon or beyond


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Paul
Whisky Quebec

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Paul le Mer 30 Oct 2013 - 0:58


Jeannot
Whisky Quebec

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Jeannot le Sam 23 Aoû 2014 - 14:50

Installation des boucliers thermiques latéraux sur la capsule Orion.

Petit à petit l'oiseau se prépare.




Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians dressed in clean-room suits have installed a back shell tile panel onto the Orion crew module and are checking the fit next to the middle back shell tile panel. Preparations are underway for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1.
Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system.
> Engineers and Technicians Install Protective Shell on NASA’s Orion Spacecraft
Image Credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis

http://www.nasa.gov/content/back-shell-tile-panels-installed-on-nasas-orion-spacecraft/#.U_h69aOPb_o

Jeannot
Whisky Quebec

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Jeannot le Jeu 6 Nov 2014 - 14:08

a
La capsule Orion prête pour être déplacée vers son aire de lancement

Cela semble nous ramener quelques années en arrière.



Orion Prepares to Move to Launch Pad
On Dec. 4, Orion is scheduled to launch atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 37 in Florida. During the test, Orion will travel 3,600 miles in altitude above Earth. 4 1/2 hours later, the spacecraft will reenter the atmosphere at 20,000 mph and splash down in the Pacific Ocean. Orion’s first flight will verify launch and high-speed reentry systems such as avionics, attitude control, parachutes and the heat shield.
Four recently-installed protective panels make up Orion's Ogive. The Ogive reduces drag and acoustic load on the crew module, making it a smoother ride for the spacecraft. Pictured here, inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane brings the fourth and final Ogive panel closer for installation on Orion's Launch Abort System.
The Ogive installation was one of the last pieces of the puzzle for Orion prior to its move to the launch pad on Nov. 10. There, it will be lifted and attached to the rocket for its December launch

http://www.nasa.gov/content/orion-prepares-to-move-to-launch-pad/#.VFtxZ1eFAVg

Beochien
Whisky Charlie

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Beochien le Lun 17 Nov 2014 - 18:44

Le véhicule de service pour la capsule Orion, sera un dérivé de l'ATV, Airbus vient de le gagner !

Avec une capacité de rescue humaine ? Pas trop compris ...

http://eandt.theiet.org/news/2014/nov/airbus-orion-service-module.cfm

Paul
Whisky Quebec

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Paul le Lun 17 Nov 2014 - 18:49

Beochien a écrit:Le véhicule de service pour la capsule Orion, sera un dérivé de l'ATV, Airbus vient de le gagner !

Avec une capacité de rescue humaine ? Pas trop compris ...

http://eandt.theiet.org/news/2014/nov/airbus-orion-service-module.cfm

Un contrat de 400 M d'euros. Pas seulement pour le rescue mais carrément pour se rendre à la station ou autre.

http://www.airbusgroup.com/int/en/news-media/press-releases/Airbus-Group/Financial_Communication/2014/11/20141117_airbus_defence_and_space_orion_esa_service_module.html

The intention is to use the Orion space capsule for human missions to the Moon, to asteroids and into the depths of space. Lockheed Martin Space Systems is developing and constructing the space capsule for four or more astronauts on behalf of NASA.

Planned for 2017/2018, the first Orion mission in which Europe is involved, “Exploration Mission 1”, consists of an unmanned flight to the Lagrangian points of the Moon and a return to Earth. The aim of this mission is not only to demonstrate the spacecraft’s performance capabilities before its human deployment, but also to achieve qualification for NASA’s new Space Launch System rocket. As part of “Exploration Mission 2”, Orion is then scheduled to be launched into space not earlier than 2020 with astronauts on board.

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Lun 17 Nov 2014 - 22:59

C'est l'ensemble du module de service qui sera made in europe (pourvu qu'on évite apollo XIII Very Happy )


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Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Mer 26 Nov 2014 - 14:40



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Jeannot
Whisky Quebec

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Jeannot le Sam 6 Déc 2014 - 11:48

Bien sur nous nous devions d'avoir une photo du prmier lancement d'Orion.



et

http://www.nasa.gov/content/launch-of-orion/#.VILe42fJD_p

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Sam 6 Déc 2014 - 19:20

Merci jeannot

superbe étape


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Jeannot
Whisky Quebec

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Jeannot le Jeu 8 Jan 2015 - 13:40

Le retour de la capsule Orion en Floride après son bref voyage dans l'espace



http://www.nasa.gov/content/orion-spacecraft-in-post-mission-processing-at-kennedy-space-center/#.VK55msnmkng

eolien
Whisky Quebec

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par eolien le Ven 9 Jan 2015 - 1:45

1961 - Mercury :




1964 - Gemini :



1968 - Apollo :




1961 ... 2014 ... même silhouette ... Smile


Dernière édition par eolien le Ven 9 Jan 2015 - 10:08, édité 2 fois


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Eolien
La dialectique est l'art d'atteindre la vérité au moyen de la discussion des opinions.

eolien
Whisky Quebec

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par eolien le Ven 9 Jan 2015 - 9:12

Admin a écrit:Merci jeannot

superbe étape
M'ouais ... un demi siècle d'aventure, de héros, de morts, pour, après la précision des retours des navettes en revenir à retomber un peu au hasard dans l'océan ... comme les tout premiers vols ...


_________________
Eolien
La dialectique est l'art d'atteindre la vérité au moyen de la discussion des opinions.

Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Poncho (Admin) le Ven 9 Jan 2015 - 9:37

Eolien t'as mis 2 fois Apollo

C'est le progrès
Ils ont réduit le pas et la largeur des sièges
Et mis des commandes de vol électriques


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massemini
Whisky Quebec

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par massemini le Ven 9 Jan 2015 - 9:45

Il va y avoir une grosse évolution grâce à SpaceX!
Dans 25 h (sauf report), 1ère récupération du 1er étage sur une plateforme.
Plus tard, récupération du 2 ième aussi.
Plus tard récupération de la capsule Dragon et des 2 étages sur la terre ferme.

Contenu sponsorisé

Re: Capsule ORION

Message par Contenu sponsorisé Aujourd'hui à 0:06


    La date/heure actuelle est Sam 10 Déc 2016 - 0:06