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EC145 et dérivés militaires

Poncho (Admin)
Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie


EC145 et dérivés militaires Empty EC145 et dérivés militaires

Message par Poncho (Admin) Jeu 30 Juil 2009 - 23:03

J'initie ce fil avec l'actualité
http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2009/07/30/330374/eads-shows-as645-can-meet-us-armys-long-distance-missions.html



EADS shows AS645 can meet US Army's long-distance missions
By Stephen Trimble

EADS North America has sweetened its offer to supply armed scout helicopters to the US Army based on the unarmed UH-72 Lakota light utility helicopter.

The Armed Scout AS645, unveiled by an EADS/Lockheed Martin team in May, exceeded the army's 2h 12min endurance threshold in a recent demonstration flight, with 35min of reserve fuel, EADS announced on 29 July.

EADS had previously revealed to flightglobal.com that the AS645 could meet the army's requirements for hover in "high-hot" conditions - 6,000ft (1,840m) and 35°C (95°F) - from a previous flight demonstration.

The helicopter used in the new demonstration also carried a simulated combat payload weighing 1,045kg (2,300lb).


©️ EADS North America


The AS645's demonstrated endurance still falls far short of the army's objective requirement for a 2h 40min sortie with 35min reserve fuel, but EADS claims to have a "technical path" to reach this goal.

After cancelling its Bell Helicopter ARH-70 armed reconnaissance helicopter deal last October, army officials are analysing alternatives for replacing the Bell OH-58 Kiowa scout.

The service launched the analysis after issuing basic requirements for an armed scout helicopter in November, only to find industry unable to meet them at the time.

Army officials have said they do not anticipate launching a new acquisition programme until the analysis is complete late next year, but the helicopter industry has continued to make unsolicited overtures based on adapting aircraft already in its inventory. Boeing is offering the AH-6S Phoenix, a slightly enlarged version of the single-engined AH-6M mission enhanced Little Bird flown by the US Special Operations Command.

EADS is already supplying 322 UH-72s to the army for non-battlefield support rules, including the national guard's homeland security and civil support missions. The twin-engined helicopter, based on the Eurocopter EC145, is being assembled at an American Eurocopter factory in Colombus, Mississippi.

EADS says the factory's output can grow immediately from 40 a year today to 60, and surge to up to 105 helicopters annually in two years.


En synthèse, pour répondre à un hypothètique appel d'offre pour un hélicoptère éclaireur (scout ?) armé remplaçant du OH58 Kiowa, EADS propose une version armée du UH72 Lacota (dérivé du EC145)... baptisée EC645.

EADS a fait quelques tests d'endurance (2h12) et de plafond de vol stationnaire par temps chaud et en altitude.

L'UH72 est fabriqué au US (Mississipi).

Sur les rangs pour cet appel d'offre éventuel qui viendrait en remplacement du programme Bell ARH70, Boeing également avec un AH6S Phoenix (version aggrandie de celui là http://news.soc.mil/factsheets/160th_LittleBird.pdf )

Bonne soirée à tous


Dernière édition par Admin le Sam 14 Nov 2009 - 22:55, édité 1 fois


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aubla
aubla
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Message par aubla Lun 5 Oct 2009 - 21:52

Bonsoir,

Serait-ce une future bonne nouvelle ?
L'armé US envisagerait une nouvelle commande après les 345 appareils déjà achetés :

http://www.aerocontact.com/actualite_aeronautique_spatiale/ac-l-us-army-pourrait-commander-davantage-d-helicopteres-a-eads~08914.html

Bonne nuit
Poncho (Admin)
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Whisky Charlie


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Message par Poncho (Admin) Lun 5 Oct 2009 - 23:30

Merci Aubla !

On parle de lui http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UH-72_Lakota

Non ?

Bonne soirée


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aubla
aubla
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Message par aubla Mar 6 Oct 2009 - 8:24

Bonjour

Lakota est effectivement le nom donné à l'UH-72A.
C'est un dérivé militarisé (mais non armé) de l'EC145
bien connu de ce côté de l'Atlantique.
Les appareils livrés ont, dans un premier temps, été assemblés
dans l'usine American Eurocopter de Colombus (Mississipi)une filiale d'EADS North America.
Depuis Mars 2009, ils y sont totalement construits à la cadence de 3 ou 4 par mois, mais je pense que des éléments importants doivent venir de "chez nous" ?

Bonne journée
Poncho (Admin)
Poncho (Admin)
Whisky Charlie


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Message par Poncho (Admin) Mar 6 Oct 2009 - 9:13

Merci Aubla !

Bonne journée à vous aussi


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Message par Poncho (Admin) Sam 14 Nov 2009 - 22:58

Bonsoir,

Un long article sur l'UH72 Lakota en service

Bonne lecture

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story_generic.jsp?channel=awst&id=news/UH72_111309.xml&headline=Guard Moves To UH-72A Lakota For Medevac



Guard Moves To UH-72A Lakota For Medevac

Nov 13, 2009



Robert Wall/Jeddah, Saudi Arabia


With its modern glass cockpit, twin-engine safety and performance, and reduced noise and vibration, the Eurocopter UH-72A Lakota provides a chance for U.S. Army National Guard units to at last catch up with the advances made in light utility helicopters.

The UH-72A is a commercial off-the-shelf replacement for the venerable UH-1 Huey, performing missions for which the UH-60 Black Hawk is too big or too expensive. Primary missions for the militarized Eurocopter EC145 include medevac, disaster relief, passenger transport and law-enforcement support. More than 200 of the 345 UH-72As to be acquired by the Army will be fielded with Guard units, about 25% of them configured for medevac.

The District of Columbia National Guard’s 121st Medical Company (Air Ambulance) is the first Guard unit to receive aircraft in medevac configuration: six UH-72As replacing nine UH-1H/Vs. Two additional aircraft will be delivered in 2012 to the 1-224th Aviation Battalion (Security and Support), replacing two OH-58s. The aircraft are based at Ft. Belvoir, Va., and will be joined by eight UH-72As of the active Army’s 12th Aviation Battalion in support of the Washington military district.

Training is provided by Eurocopter at its Grand Prairie, Tex., facility, where this Aviation Week pilot, a former Army aviator experienced in the UH-1, had the opportunity to see how the UH-72A compares, flying a company-owned Lakota used as a transition trainer.

A contract for the initial lot of UH-72As was signed in June 2006, with the first aircraft delivered in December of that year. Eurocopter has delivered 85 UH-72As to Army and Guard units, and the first of five for the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School. The 100th aircraft is on the line at American Eurocopter’s Columbus, Miss., facility, where production has reached 55 a year,

All UH-72As are FAA-certified and are military/civil hybrids. Sgt. George Wagner, a crew chief with the 121st, says maintenance personnel training for the UH-72A will graduate with an FAA airframe and powerplant license as well as a military certification. Specialist Lauren Bloch, a flight medic with the 121st, says medical personnel finish training with a basic emergency medical technician certification and are encouraged to become qualified as civilian paramedics.

While the UH-1 carried more payload than the UH‑72A (roughly 4,500 lb. compared with 3,777 lb.), the Lakota’s greater speed and range make up for the difference. Particularly significant for training is its 3.5-hr. endurance, says Maj. Mark Escherich, commanding officer of the 121st.

Frank Kanauka, Eurocopter’s senior pilot for the UH-72A program, pointed out the few exterior differences from the civil EC145 during our walk-around. Most obvious are the nose-mounted wire cutters and extensions on the landing skid: If the helicopter hits a wire below the nose but above the skids, the extensions would direct it below the skids.

The EC145 has optional twin windows in the rear clamshell doors. The UH-72A does not, but in my opinion they would allow more light into the stretcher area for the medic and provide better rearward visibility to the crew chief for confined-area landings.

The main differences are inside the aircraft, the biggest being the number of radios. During disaster-relief operations following Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the Army found its helicopters were unable to communicate with many civilian agencies. As a result, Eurocopter has installed eight VHF, UHF and FM radios in the 400-800-MHz. range for civil support operations, plus one for secure military transmissions. The avionics suite includes Chelton, Garmin and Wulfsberg radios. For operation in civil airspace, redundant Garmin 430s provide communication and GPS navigation.

The system allows the pilot to preprogram three VHF frequencies, an advantage when operating in an area requiring multiple frequency changes over a short period of time, says Lt. Col. Maureen Bellamy, state aviation officer for the D.C. National Guard. “The aircraft’s avionics package allows us to communicate directly with the first responders—law enforcement agencies, fire departments, hospitals and others—something that our old radios did not,” she says.

The redundancy and reliability of the twin Turbomeca Arriel 1E2 engines also are “a significant factor when flying over dense urban areas like the District of Columbia, where safe landing areas are not readily available,” she notes.

While the UH-72A does not have all the “bells and whistles” on civil EC145s, certain niceties can be added as required. These include air conditioners for aircraft in hot areas and engine inlet barrier filters for sandy areas. Some will also have hoist and cargo hooks as required.

The aft cabin, including baggage area, is 4.59 ft. wide by up to 11.23 ft. long, with 50.77 sq. ft. of usable floor space. While the civil version can hold eight seats in a 3-2-3 configuration, the Army will use either two or three rearward-facing seats for medevac or a 3-3 configuration with the seats facing each other for personnel transport. In medevac configuration, two stretchers enter through the clamshell door, sliding along rails that secure them to the floor—a big advance over the UH-1 where stretchers were hung from straps, says Bloch.

The D.C. National Guard is in discussion with Martin-Baker to develop a seat that can slide along the rails where the second stretcher would be, allowing the medic to treat anything from a head injury to a broken ankle while still buckled in. The movable seat will be able to rotate 360 deg. with locking positions every 15 deg.

Entering the cockpit is fairly simple. The cabin floor is just over 3 ft. from the ground, but there is a step running the length of the skid at about 1.5 ft. up. The small cockpit required a bit of gyration to get a leg up and over the cyclic; but once seated, I was comfortable. The seats are adjusted via a lever underneath, much like the Huey. The pedals have pins that pull up, then drop back down into slots once adjusted—rather awkward to do while sitting in the pilot’s seat, so it is best to set it before getting in.

Startup is simple, a matter of flipping the right switches and watching the vehicle and engine multifunction display (VEMD), which includes the first limit indicator (FLI). This is a display with a circular indicator numbered from 0 to 16, the figures representing specific values for torque, turbine outlet temperature and N1 commensurate with atmospheric conditions, Kanauka says. If the needles are at 8.5 FLI, the aircraft is at maximum continuous power and 71% torque or equivalent N1, 10 is 88% torque, while 11 is 91.5%.

As with most glass cockpits in modern helicopters, the FLI does not provide specific data the way the Huey did, but simply lets the pilot know if one of the three parameters is being exceeded. In the UH-72A, a small box will light up beside the errant parameter. Actual percentage figures for the left and right engine parameters are also presented digitally on the respective sides of the circular gauge, color-coded with yellow (caution) and red (alert) tick marks indicating that 10 is the limit for takeoff power, 11 is maximum continuous power with one engine inoperative, and 12 the maximum for 2.5 min. of single-engine operation.

Below the VEMD, on the UH-72A’s central panel is a second liquid-crystal display showing engine and main gearbox parameters. A third panel is the cautions and advisories display, and includes fuel-quantity indication. Each pilot has two larger primary flight and navigation displays. There are also five circular analogue “steam gauges” across the top of the central panel as a backup, including a clock, artificial horizon, rotor/engine rpm., airspeed and altitude.

Picking up to a hover is much like in the Huey, with the right skid coming off first, then the left, then a slight pitch of the nose. And, like the Huey, adjustment to a stabilized hover comes without thinking about it.

I expected the UH-72A to have similar control characteristics to the OH-58, since both are small, “sporty” aircraft. But the Lakota has a heavier control feel more like the Huey, with some force required to move the cyclic. To counter that force in the Huey, I tended to hover with the force trim off. But when I turned off force trim in the Lakota, the aircraft became too sensitive.

Cyclic movement can also be controlled using a “coolie” hat on the stick. But input is slow, so unless you are flying straight and level, it is best to keep force trim on, coolie hat neutralized and accept the force required for cyclic movement.

We were about 800 lb. below the maximum weight of 7,903 lb. with an outside air temperature of 20C at just over 580 ft. MSL, making it a fairly representative flight. I stuck the tail into an 18-20-kt. tailwind; there was plenty of tail-rotor authority and I did not come close to running out of pedal. The aircraft wiggled a bit, but was controllable, with no tendency for the tail to lift as it hovered into the wind.

A normal takeoff with a standard 500-fpm. climb was accomplished pulling only 63% of the maximum 88% torque allowed. If there is any limitation, it will normally be on torque, says Kanauka. A maximum-performance takeoff from a confined area with a 1,700-fpm. climb pulled only 86% torque.

The aircraft will cruise “all day long at maximum cruise speed at 71%,” Kanauka says. I reached 135 kt. at 67% torque and took it to 139 kt., pulling 71% torque, before backing off. Maximum cruise speed is about 140 kt.

One unique characteristic of the aircraft is a variable rotor/engine speed. Standard hover and climb rpm. is 100‑101%. But once the aircraft passes through 55 kt., rpm. automatically drops to 96.5%, reducing noise and fuel consumption. Noise reduction is aided by the hingeless rotor system with monolithic titanium hub, all of which combine to produce a noise level 6.7 dBa. below International Civil Aviation Organization limits, says Eurocopter.

The aircraft is also relatively vibration free, even lacking the traditional pronounced shudder as it passed through translational lift. Bloch says the low vibration in the aft cabin allows easy and accurate setting of intravenous injections into veins during flight, something that was difficult, if not impossible, in the back of a Huey.

Another advantage was demonstrated by a confined-area approach to a small tree-covered island in Joe Pool Lake just south of Grand Prairie. The aircraft is only 42.65 ft. from main-rotor to tail-rotor tip with blades turning, compared with roughly 57 ft. for the Huey. This small footprint, plus reduced rotor wash, “clearly makes operations safer and easier at hospital helipads and anywhere else where the landing zone is small,” Bellamy says. Small size also allows for rapid transportability, with up to five UH-72As fitting into a C-17, two with blades removed and three with blades folded.

The aircraft is not intended for combat and is restricted to domestic operations, although some are to be delivered to Puerto Rico, Germany and Kwajalein in the Pacific. Deployment to low-threat environments such as Kosovo and Serbia is under discussion. The Army has established training standards for tactical flying to include nap-of-the-earth operations, but Escherich says not enough data have been compiled on the impact on component wear.

The aircraft is almost totally automatic, both for navigation and flight control as well as for instrument approaches, with dual Sagem autopilots and Garmin GPS auto-approach. One of the dual GPS systems is coupled to the autopilot to provide auto-navigation. Operation is essentially “dial-in,” with the pilot simply entering the settings and letting the aircraft do the work.

Escherich says pilots used to flying legacy aircraft such as the UH-1 need to learn to manage the reduced workload provided by the UH-72A’s coupled navigation and control systems. Whereas in the Huey, pilots are constantly flying the aircraft, in the Lakota everything is so automatic that pilots could become lax and “have to be more cognizant of the cockpit requirements,” he says. But this reduced workload allows the pilot to focus more on decision-making, “and in my opinion has greatly increased the willingness and confidence of our pilots to file and fly [in instrument meteorological conditions].”

The aircraft’s full automatic stabilization also allows hands-off flight and, to some extent, hovering, although its hover hold is not as stable as in the AH-64 Apache.

Versus the UH-1, the UH-72A is a sports car compared to a family sedan. On my first approach, I turned base to final and began reducing airspeed and altitude. Reaching 60 kt., I looked outside to check the approach angle, looked back inside and was doing 90 kt. Kanauka says the aircraft is “very speedy,” with the tendency to approach too fast, causing new pilots to have to make a big flare at the end.

The airspeed display has a “tendency indicator” that moves up or down from the actual airspeed indicator, letting the pilot know where speed will be within 5 sec. if not corrected. This allows the pilot to adjust the cyclic accordingly, although I initially tried to chase the line rather than make a correction and hold it—a rookie mistake.

Finally, as a former Huey pilot who has sat for an eternity just waiting for the rotor blades to stop turning, I particularly liked one other feature on the UH-72A—a rotor brake.



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jullienaline
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Message par jullienaline Ven 5 Mar 2010 - 22:40

Bonsoir à tous,

Le 100ème UH-72 vient d'être livré.

EC145 et dérivés militaires Photo_library_15_smEC145 et dérivés militaires 2010-04-04

http://www.uh-72a.com/news-press-releases/2010/2010_03_04.asp

http://www.defpro.com/news/details/13598/

Amicalement


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Poncho (Admin)
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Message par Poncho (Admin) Ven 23 Avr 2010 - 9:04

Bonjour à tous

Poursuite des grandes manoeuvres pour les hélicoptères...

A la base toujours L-martin qui essaie de miser sur les bons chevaux j'imagine

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2010/04/22/340809/eads-lockheed-launch-technology-demonstration-for-oh-58.html



EADS North America and Lockheed Martin will modify three Eurocopter EC145s into technology demonstrators this year in advance of a potential competition to replace the US Army's Bell OH-58D Kiowa Warriors.

The newly rebranded AAS-72X (formerly AS645) project seeks to build on EADS's success with the army's UH-72A Lakota light utility helicopter. The service has already agreed to buy 345 UH-72As, accepting the EC145 in civil configuration for non-combat missions only.

To compete for the potential requirement to replace the OH-58D armed aerial scout, EADS must modify the EC145 to meet the army's military airworthiness specifications.


©️ EADS North America


The first AAS-72X demonstrator will be modified and tested in two phases. The first series of tests at American Eurocopter's facility in Grand Prairie, Texas, will focus on a new communications and navigation suite. For the second phase, EADS will integrate a mission systems package, including pylons and weapons.

The aircraft also will receive Lockheed Martin's tactical automated sensor system targeting package now used by the US Marine Corps' Bell AH-1Z fleet.

A second demonstrator aircraft will be based in Germany. Its role will be to test the structural modifications necessary to meet a military airworthiness specification, which includes armouring and ballistic protection.


Pour rappel l'EC145, dont la plaque d'immat est libellée BK117-C2 avait un ancrêtre BK-117M militarisé dont on peut retrouvé des photos d'époque avec un viseur de rotor

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MBB/Kawasaki_BK_117

3 news successives pour 3 appels d'offres hélicoptère à venir, avec comme pivot L-Martin.

Intéressant

Bonne lecture


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Message par jullienaline Lun 21 Juin 2010 - 22:10

Bonsoir à tous,

Eurocopter a présenté à EuroSatory un nouveau dérivé de cette famille : le EC645

Eurocopter’s multi-role EC645 military helicopter to make its debut at the 2010 Eurosatory exhibition

The newest member of Eurocopter’s military helicopter family will be shown for the first time at next week’s Eurosatory defense exhibition with the EC645’s unveiling as a highly capable, medium-sized multirole platform for armed reconnaissance, fire support, observation, airlift missions and search & rescue.

The EC645 is the militarized version of Eurocopter’s EC145 helicopter, which is in widespread use worldwide for homeland security, para-military, law enforcement, search & rescue and medical evacuation missions, along with other applications. The U.S. Army currently is acquiring 345 EC145s in the UH-72A configuration as its new Light Utility Helicopter, while a U.S.-specific armed version called the AAS-72X is to be proposed for the U.S. military’s Armed Aerial Scout requirement.

The EC645 responds to demands for a 3.5-metric ton weight category that can be rapidly reconfigured for a full range of mission requirements to meet complex combat scenarios such as asymmetric warfare.

EC145 et dérivés militaires EC645-02

Equipped with the Stand Alone Weapon System (SAWS) developed by Eurocopter and ATE, the EC645 incorporates a mission computer, an electro-optical system with TV and infrared cameras and laser telemeter (with laser designator as needed), a targeting system with a helmet mounted sight and display, two multi-purpose weapon pylons with slaving units, and a choice of weapons loads (guns, missiles and unguided or guided rockets).
This integrated weapons system – combined with the aircraft’s glass cockpit – provides full situational awareness for the crew, while self-protection is provided by the helicopter’s armor, self-sealing fuel tanks, threat detectors and chaff/flare dispensers.

The EC645’s unobstructed large main cabin is easily re-configurable to maximize its mission flexibility and the helicopter's sliding side and rear clamshell doors optimize access. The high-set main and tail rotors provide unparalleled safety, access and space utilization, and allow loading/unloading of cargo, passengers and patients while the rotors are turning.
http://www.eurocopter.com/site/FO/scripts/myFO_publication.php?news_id=694&lang=EN

Amicalement


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Message par Poncho (Admin) Mar 3 Avr 2012 - 9:39

Bonjour à tous,

Celui là il ne faut pas le louper

http://www.armedscout.com/news-press-rel-2009-2012/04-02-2012.asp

AAS-72X+ sur base EC145T2 donc avec Fenestron et plus de puissance

A suivre


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Message par Poncho (Admin) Mar 23 Sep 2014 - 14:03

En attendant j'avais loupé ça

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/09/23/finmeccanica-airbus-lawsuit-idUSL2N0RO04E20140923


The U.S. Army issued a notice to industry on Sept. 4, saying that it planned to buy only EC-145 helicopters to replace its fleet of primary training helicopters.

The Army plans to repurpose about 100 twin-engine UH-72A Airbus light utility helicopters that are being used in the field as training helicopters, and then buy 155 additional helicopters made by Airbus. The UH-72A helicopters are a modified version of Airbus's commercial EH-145 helicopter.



Ce qui ne plait pas à Augusta Westland ni à Bell



Je creuse un peu


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Message par Poncho (Admin) Mar 23 Sep 2014 - 14:10

Ben en creusant rien trouvé !
Il y a eu 300 UH72 de livré à ce jour (quand même !)


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Message par Poncho (Admin) Mar 23 Sep 2014 - 14:25

Trouvé

http://www.marinecorpstimes.com/article/20131209/NEWS04/312090006/

http://www.defensenews.com/article/20140227/DEFREG02/302270027/US-Army-Seeks-Purchase-100-Lakota-Helicopters

Donc 100 Lakota en remplacement des Jetrange utilisés pour l'instruction
C'est un "compromis"

En attendant le remplaçant du Kiowa


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Message par Beochien Mer 28 Fév 2018 - 16:14

Noté, le EC145e D'Airbus.

Version low cost, qui prend des cdes civiles, aux USA, fabriqué à Columbus ... Sur la FAL du Lakota, celle qui énerve Augusta Westland  Twisted Evil

330 Livres pour l'IFR, supprimé pour de nombreux clients, et une étude plus légère en cours  ... 330 lbs, ça parait énorme pour de l'instrumentation, surtout pour un hélico "Medium"

https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/business-aviation/2018-02-27/metro-orders-25-airbus-ec145e-helicopters
audac
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Message par audac Mer 28 Fév 2018 - 16:23

Beochien a écrit:
330 Livres pour l'IFR, supprimé pour de nombreux clients, et une étude plus légère en cours  ... 330 lbs, ça parait énorme pour de l'instrumentation, surtout pour un hélico "Medium"
Je suppose qu'en plus de l'instrumentation "IFR", il doit y avoir des dispositifs d'anti givrage comptés dans les 330 lbs, avec un système Electric renforcé.

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